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Summer Nights

 

At 1

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INTRO

  • Welcome everyone
  • Hi my name is Murph. I am your Boston guide.
  • This is going to be a great tour.
  • As we go through the city;
    we’ll see great landmarks, sights, and museums
    we’ll talk about food, shopping, Sports, arts...
  • ...and of course History. And Boston has a lot of history-
    -almost 400 years old
    -the American revolution began here
    -and many 1sts happened here
    —such as the 1st marathon, 1st public school 1st library
  • I’ll also point out locations that you may have seen on TV shows or in movies.

About them

  • 1st time in Boston?
  • From out of state?

Happenings

  • Here’s what’s happening

About ME

  • Native Bostonian/born and raised
    Same house
    Been on every street in Boston
    2nd generation Irish
    Parents from same neighborhood
    Eamonn-4th gen at 164
    Stevie Clegg and Joe Fitz
    St. B’s
  • 1976; Bicentennial when I was in Grammer school. I was hooked by history...now I get to share this with you

the tour

Safeties

Any Questions?

Special occassion?

History Lesson

  • Eve of Revolution; Sons of Liberty/Revere-Hancock-Adams

History Lesson

  • Eve of Revolution; It didn’t happen all of a sudden; Sitting around doing colonists stuff and some guy named Larry said “I know, I think we should rebel and start our own country.” / Sons of Liberty / Revere-Hancock-Adams / Hazzah / This day in history /

Joke

  • Carraroe
    Candle in Rome

Leaving 1

Play the Judy Garland

Ring Bell

Tween 1 & 2

Long Wharf

  • 1710
  • Longest wharf
  • 1,800 feet long, up to State Street and out into Boston Harbor.
  • October 1, 1768 the British Soldiers arrived

Evacuation Day

  • March 17, 1776, 8,900 troops on 78 vessels evacuated Boston.
  • Colonial forces under the leadership of General George Washington captured Dorchester Heights and placed cannons there, which had been brought to Boston by Colonel Henry Knox, from Fort Ticonderoga. This effectively forced General Howe to leave Boston with his troops and about 1000 loyalists to the British Crown and retreat to Nova Scotia.
  • Declaration of Independance arrived in July, 1776

Greenway Carousel

  • August 31, 2013
  • 14 types of critters from land, sea and air from Massachusetts.

Columbus Park

  • 1976—discovered America
  • Memorial for nine Massachusetts men killed in the 1983 Beirut bombing. installed 1992.
  • Dedicated to Gold State Mothers

Rose Garden

  • 1987
  • Matriarch of the Kennedy clan.
  • Born in the North End on July 22, 1890.
  • Died January of 1995 at the age of 104.
  • Baptized and eulogized at St. Stephen’s Church on Hanover St. (only church building left in Boston designed by Charles Bulfinch.)
  • Her father was John F. Fitzgerald, Honey Fitz, congressman and Mayor of Boston.
  • Rose would accompany her father on official business so she was well adapted to political life.

The Chart House/Hancock Offices

  • Built in 1763—oldest building on the waterfront.
  • John Hancock offices in the building,—Hancock’s Counting House.
  • The Gardiner Building.

North End Settled

History

  • Inhabited since September 17, 1630.
  • Oldest residential neighborhood in the city
  • Puritans—John Wintrop—first settlers
  • Late 17th century—mansions
  • Mid-1700’s—mainly tradesmen and shopkeepers, — Paul Revere.
  • The ethnic character has changed over the years. The the first home to many immigrant groups comin by boat. Lived near where they disembarked
  • Irish, mid and late 1800s
  • 1920, 90% Ital birth or descent.

Today

  • The trolley can’t travel through the streets of the North End because they are too narrow.
  • Today, 30%
  • Still feels Italian; summer feast/festival every weekend, 100 Italian restaurants and bakeries.

Modern, Mikes, Bovas

Shortest Line is best restaurant

Water front

  • Wharves
  • Urban renewal

Paul Revere House

The house

  • Oldest wooden building in Boston proper
  • built around 1680.
  • Built on the site of the Reverend Increase Mather’s house, destroyed in the fire in 1676.
  • Been stores, a bank and a boarding house.

Paul Revere’s residence

  • Paul Revere bought it in 1770.
  • Live with 2 wives and 6 children
  • Too crowded to barracks troops—allowed Revere to move freely
  • The Revere house was purchased in 1902 by Revere’s great grandsons to save it from destruction. It was restored in 1907 and opened in 1908 as a museum. It is now on the Freedom Trail and offers self-guided tours.

Paul Revere

  • Silversmith, a goldsmith, a coppersmith, a dentist, a bell ringer, a bell caster, President of Boston Inspectionlal services (privies), an entrepreneur and a courier for the Sons of Liberty.
  • He rode thousands of miles as a courier for the patriot cause to New York and Philly, and including his midnight ride.
  • Never owned his own horse.
  • After the Revolution, Paul opened the first copper mill in the US thus making the Copper sheeting that in 1802, was used on the USS Constitution.
  • He became a wealthy man. Paul Revere died in 1818 having outlived both wives and all but 5 of his children.
  • Died May 10, 1818. Buried in Old Granary Burial Ground.

Hanover St

  • Restaurants, bakeries to start

Coast GUard Base

Old north church

  • Christ Church—oldest church in Boston
  • Opened December 29, 1723.
  • Episcopalian
  • Steeple is 197 feet
  • Robert Newman hung two lanterns, at the request of Paul Revere, on the night of April 18, 1775, to signal to the Charlestown Militia that the British would leave Boston Common “by sea”. (Charles River)
  • Thousands buried in the crypts below the church

Bocci court

Copp Hill

  • British troops camped during occupation
  • British cannons aimed at Charlestown.
  • On June 17, 1775 the British fired upon Charlestown during the Battle of Bunker Hill and consequently burned the town down.

Copp Hill Graveyard

  • Second oldest in Boston
  • Commoners but great grave stores
  • Buried here,
    -the Mather’s—Influential Puritan Ministers, Harvard deans
    -Robert Newman, hung the lanterns in the Old North Church steeple,
    -Prince Hall, the first Black Mason. started the first school for African Americans in Boston
    -Daniel Malcolm. The British that were encamped nearby used it for target practice. “a true son of liberty” inscribed on his tombstone.
  • Many born in 1500s during Queen Elizabeth’s reign

Before 2

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Approach Safety

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Revere’s house
    The Old North Church
    North End of Boston
    Copp’s Hill Burial ground
    Hanover St

At 2

Off Safety

On Safety

Rules

Leave 2

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • The next stop will be Stop #3,
    the U.S.S. Constitution.
    Bunker Hill Monument
    Museum of Science
    USS CAssin Young

Jack Nicholson Safety

BeTween 2 & 3

Freedom Trail

  • A free walking tour, 2.5 miles (one way)
  • 16 historical sites involved in the revolution
  • Begins at the Boston Common Visitor’s Center and ends at the Bunker Hill Monument
  • Red line on the sidewalks and streets (sometimes painted, mostly set in red brick)
  • Bronze signs mark the sites.

Prince Spaghetti Day

  • Commercial in the North End in the 70s.

Paul Revere’s Ride

  • At the Eliot school

Intro

  • Paul Revere’s Midnight ride was crucial to the American Revolution. We are now near the place where his ride began.

The ride was made famous by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s famous poem; Listen my children and you shall hear...

  • He was a poet not a historian, he never let facts get in the way of a good story. Let me tell you the my story titled The Quarter Past Eleven Ride of Paul Revere, (and William Dawes and 49 other riders.)

Set Up

  • In the 1770s, colonists would see themselves as proud British citizens who are being treated unfairly by their beloved king.
  • By 1775, tensions between the American colonies and the British government had approached the breaking point.
  • In April, 1775, British troops had orders to confiscate guns and ammunition at Concord and to arrest Patriot leaders Sam Adams and John Hancock, hiding at Lexington.
  • American spies knew this. But they just didn’t know when or how. They were prepared, though.
  • Earlier in the month, Revere aranged for a signal from the Old North Church was the tallest point in Boston. 1 lantern would be hung if the British were marching out of by Boston Neck, and 2 lanterns would be hung if they were crossing the Charles River to Cambridge.
  • Then, on the evening of April 18, 1775, British troops snuck out of Boston for Lexington and Concord. Gen Howe hoped to prevent blood shed.
  • As the British departed, Boston Patriots Paul Revere and William Dawes were ordered to set out from the city to warn Adams and Hancock and rouse the Minutemen.

The race was on

  • They took separate routes in case one of them was captured:
    Dawes left the city via the Boston Neck peninsula.
    Revere crossed the Charles River to Charlestown by boat.
  • Paul Revere stopped by the Old North Church first to ask Robert Newman, to hang two lanterns, as a signal to the Charlestown Militia. — This was a signal from Revere not to him. If he could not get out of Boston, someone from Charlestown would have rode out to warn Adams and Hancock and alert the Minutemen.
  • At the Boston shore line
  • Paul Revere came to the shore here to row across to Charlestown.
  • At that time, there was no bridge across. The only way to get across was by boat.
  • The Harbor
  • The British man-of-war Somerset is anchored mid river to keep men like Paul Revere in the city; however, Revere’ sneaked past the ship, thanks to the slow rise of the moon.
  • At the Charlestown shore line
  • He came a shore here. Today that is Paul Revere Park.
  • He walked across the street where Deacon Larkin was waiting with the fastest horse in the area—Brown Beauty
  • He goes West —If you listen, you can still hear him riding

Hoofs

  • Revere was not yelling ‘The British are coming’. Instead, “The Regulars are out”.
  • Revere and Dawes had quietly alerted residents by knocking on the doors of safe houses. Hundreds of Minutemen were alerted and they armed themselves and set out to oppose the British.

Arrive In Lex

  • Revere arrived in Lexington at 11:30, shortly before Dawes, and they warned Adams and Hancock and then went Concord.
  • Along the way, they were joined by Samuel Prescott, a young Patriot who had been riding home after visiting a lady friend.
    Doesn’t sound very Puritan to me but, it was the 70s.
  • On the way, a British patrol captured them. Prescott escaped and rode on to Concord to warn the Patriots there.
  • After being questioned for an hour, Revere was released when the patrol heard Minutemen alarm guns being fired on their approach to Lexington.

Battle—april 19

  • About 5 a.m., 770 British troops arrived at Lexington’s green.
  • Suddenly, the “shot heard around the world” was fired from an undetermined gun.
  • When the brief Battle of Lexington ended, 8 Americans lay dead and several others wounded.
  • The American War for Independance had begun.
  • Later that day, on the North Bridge in Concord, the militiamen stopped the British, and harassed them on their retreat back to Boston.
  • The British lost 273 total; 73 dead, with another 174 wounded and 26 missing in action.
  • When the British soldiers arrived in Boston, The Siege of Boston began.
  • This is celebrated as a state holiday known as Patriot’s Day.

Old North Church V2

  • Stop sign on Warren Street
  • You’ll see why The Old North Church was such a great signaling spot, for there it is right over the treetops.

Battle Road

  • British retreated toward Boston.
  • Sniping from behind trees and stone walls along the road back to Boston, Minutemen brought the British casualty count up to 200, a grievous and embarrassing loss for the powerful, well-equipped forces of the Crown.
  • and the Revolution began!

Siege of Boston

  • The siege began April 19 when the British soldiers arrived in Boston after the Battles of Lexington and Concord,
  • New England militiamen prevented the movement by land of the British Army, which was garrisoned in the peninsular of Boston
  • Genral Howe replaced General Gage
  • By June, 15,000 raw, undisciplined, ill-equipped colonials—by then called the Continental Army—surrounded a force of 6,500 British regulars commanded by General Thomas Howe.
  • This threatened to cut off the British supply lifeline from the sea.

C-Town Bridge

  • Ferry was the way from Boston to Charlestown
  • 1st Bridge between Boston and Charlestown opened in 1786,
  • 1503 feet long and was 30 feet wide had two pedestrian walkways and a center carriageway for horse drawn vehicles.

Before 3

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop # 3.
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • The Charlestown Navy Yard
    Bunker Hill Monument
    USS CONSTITUTION Museum
  • The USS CONSTITUTION, In season is Tues. – Sunday 9-6 PM. You need a valid ID and must pass through security screening, similar to Airport Screening.
  • Charlestown Visitors Center is found over by the USS CONSTITUTION. There are great exhibits about the yard through the years and a very good short video. All the attractions are free though the museums do accept donations.

At 3

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Radio Dispatch

Leave 3

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • The next stop will be Stop #4,
    the TD Garden,
    North Station.
    Amtrack
    North End
    Museum and Science

Tween 3 & 4

Bang a U-y Here

USS Cassin Young

  • Fletcher class destroyer open to the public
  • restored to her late 1950’s appearance.
  • Docked here permanently is representative of the ships that were built here at the Navy Yard during WW. II.
  • A navy commander awarded the Medal of Honor for his valiant actions at Pearl Harbor and died at Guadalcanal.

USS Constitution

  • Nation’s Ship of State
  • Oldest Commissioned warship afloat in the world.
  • Built in Boston, across the harbor where the Coast Guard Station is today, between 1794 &1797
  • protect American merchant ships from plundering by the Barbary pirates as well as the British and French navies.
  • Undefeated in all her engagements with the enemy.
  • Famous battle with the H.M.S. Guerriere, off Nova Scotia during the War of 1812. USS Constitution sank the Guerriere in less than 35 minutes after firing the first shot, making it the shortest naval battle in USS Constitution history.
  • Sailors was heard to exclaim “Huzzah! Her sides must be made of iron!” since he swore that the cannonballs bounced off the sides of ship
  • Oliver Wendal Holmes ‘Old Ironsides’
  • Made of 17-to-21-inch Live Georgian Oak, and sheathed in copper, making her very durable.
  • Several times each summer USS Constitution is brought out into Boston Harbor under tugboat power, the most well-known “turnaround” cruise is on the Fourth of July.

It’s inpsiring. Let’s conquer France

Navy Yard

  • Was one of the oldest shipbuilding facilities in the United States Navy.
  • Established in 1801 as part of the recent establishment of the new U.S. Department of the Navy in 1798.
  • After 175 years of military service, it was decommissioned as a naval installation on 1 July 1974—Richard Nixon; Don’t Blame Me I’m From Massachusetts

Bunker Hill battle

Siege of Boston

  • 2 Months after the battle of Lexington and Concord, in June, 15,000 colonials—by then called the Continental Army—surrounded 6,500 British regulars commanded by General Thomas Gage garrisoned in Boston.
  • They also threatened to cut off the British supply line from the sea.
  • General Howe was planning to send troops out from the city to fortify the unoccupied hills surrounding the city, which would give them control of Boston Harbor.
  • June 13, the spies in Boston told the leaders of the colonial forces.

Overnight

  • 1,200 colonial troops built a fort on Breed’s Hill, as well as smaller fortified lines across the Charlestown Peninsula overnight.
  • The military advisors to the colonials convinced them that it would be strategically more advantageous to fortify Breed’s Hill rather than Bunker Hill so that’s exactly what they did. (There is still debate over why the Battle was actually fought on Breed’s rather than Bunker Hill.)

The Battle

  • Next day—June 17—the British were shocked to see colonial forces on the Peninsula and immediately attacked
  • Cannons from Copp’s Hill and ship in the harbor had no affect on the new fort.
  • British regulars arrived that afternoon.
  • The minutemen were ordered, “Don’t fire you see the whites of their eyes!” Colonials were very low on ammunition and they wanted to make sure every shot counted.
  • As the British soldiers attacked, their formations were broken by the uneven terrain.
  • When the regulars were very close, the Americans fired and row after row of the redcoats fell.
  • There were colonial snipers from Charlestown buildings, too. The British destroyed the city of Charlestown.

Musket shots

  • The British Army retreated, but attacked the hill again.
  • The British Army retreated again, and attacked the hill again a 3rd time.
  • Their third attack was successful because the Patriots finally had run out of ammunition and had to abandoned the hill.
  • The colonists retreated over Bunker Hill, leaving the British in control of the Peninsula.

Results

  • The British did take the hill by the day’s end and technically the Battle of Bunker Hill was a British Army victory;
  • BUT, it has always been thought of as a morale victory for the colonists since they held their own against the mighty British army and held to their principles.
  • The British Army had 2200 soldiers and lost 1054 casualties. 1/4 to 1/3 of all officers in the whole war were killed that day.
  • The colonials had between 2500-4000 troops on the hill and lost around 400-600 men to death and casualties. Only 30 Patriots were captured as they retreated.
  • Colonial General Nathaniel Greene was quoted after the battle to have said,” I wish we could sell them another hill at the same price”.

Aftermath

  • The Continental Congress appointed George Washington as Commander in Chief of the Continental Army from the militias involved in the fighting.
  • He arrived in Boston to take command in August.0
  • Geo Washington forced the British to evacuate March 17, 1776—Evacuation Day.

Common Sense

  • January 1776, Paine wrote “Common Sense,”
  • Paine fundamentally changed the tenor of colonists’ argument with the crown when he wrote the following:
    “It is absurd for an island to rule a Continent”

And then

  • July 4, 1776

Bunker Hill Monument

  • Every June 17th Boston celebrates Bunker Hill Day as a city holiday.
  • Started in 1825 and took 17 years to complete due to lack of funds.
  • The monument stands 221 feet high and has 294 steps.
  • Both the Monument and the Bunker Hill Museum across the street are free and run by the National Park Service.
  • This monument actually sits on Breed’s Hill.

Bunker Hill Museum

  • Across from the monument
  • Run by Nat’l Park Services

City Square Park/Winthrop Settlment

  • A stop on the Freedom Trail
  • Spot of the founding of Charlestown in 1628
  • Land where John Winthrop, leader of Massachusetts Bay Colony and the first governor of Massachusetts, built his home, the Great House site
  • Park of Great Migration from England—1630–1640
  • Park honors historical Charlestown figures

John Harvard Mall

  • died of consumption in 1638,
  • he donated half his £800 estate and all 300 of his books to a young Cambridge college,
  • name its school after him.

Warren Tavern

  • At 2 Pleasant St.
  • 1780
  • The first building built after the British destroyed Charlestown.
  • Named for General Joseph Warren,
  • He was shot in the head and died on the last assault on the Battle of Bunker Hill
  • he had just been named to Major General by the Massachusetts Provincial Congress, but chose to fight that day as a volunteer on the front lines at the redoubt.
  • a physician by trade; at the time of his death he was also the Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Massachusetts.
  • Joseph Warren, commander of the Massachusetts troops
  • President of Committee of Safety
  • President of Provincial Congress in Western Mass

Zakim Bridge

  • first cable stayed bridge in the United States.
  • The structure mimics the Bunker Hill Monument and the cables represent the rich sailing history of Boston.
  • Leonard P. Zakim a civil rights activist, early 60s & 70s.
  • Dedicated in October of 2002—Bruce Springsteen preformed.

Gridley Locks

  • Colonel Richard Gridley designed the fortifications on Breed’s Hill for the battle of Bunker Hill.
  • George Washington’s first Chief Engineer of the Army.
  • part of the Charles River Dam
  • pass pleasure boats only between Boston Harbor and the Charles River Basin
  • A fish ladder that allows fish to get up the to the Charles River.

CHarles River

Molasses

  • In the ball park, behind the skating rink
  • Purity Distilling Corporation, parent company was United States Industrial Alcohol
  • Used molasses as a sugar substitute, to make fine Yankee rum and to produce industrial grade alcohol for the munitions industry in WW1.
  • Building and Engineering overseen by their accountant. Improperly built and struuraly weak.
  • tank 50 feet tall and 282 feet around
  • The tank held 2,300,000 gallons of molasses
  • Many complaints that it was unsafe. Leaked always
  • They painted it molasses color
  • January 1919, still receiving shipments from Cuba even though the war was over
  • January thaw.
  • On January 15, the tank, full to the brim with no ventalation, burst, sending a 50 foot wave of sticky goo flooding the area.
  • The force of the molasses tore down the supports of the elevated railway, demolished buildings (fire station behind it) and drowned or suffocated 21 people and many horses and other small animals.
  • Property damage ran into the millions
  • Purity Distilling paid out over a million dollars to settle claims.
  • Curious sightseers tracked molasses everywhere, leaving a tacky residue on virtually every pay phone and trolley seat in the city!

The Brinks

  • The Brinks Armored Car Company
  • Jan 17, 1950, nine men broke into the headquarters and stole $2,500,000.
  • No one was hurt in the robbery.
  • There was no break in the case for the FBI until 1956 when Specs O’Keefe, one of the burglars, turned state’s evidence 11 days before the statute of limitations was up.
  • O’Keefe was arrested for another crime but was a suspect in the Brink’s crime and was convinced by the authorities that his cohorts where spending all his money from the crime.
  • All men involved were arrested and jailed but even then, only $51,906 was recovered!

Converse Factory

  • Designing your new favorite Chuckie_Ts at the in-store customization studios.
  • Ship anywhere

Causway St

  • “a road or railway on top an embankment usually across a broad body of water or wetland.”
  • In between the North End and the West End promontories of the peninsula lay the Mill Pond, a marshy cove that filled at high tide and drained out at low tide.

Before 4

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #4
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • TD Garden,
    Sports Museum of New England,
    Boston Bruins pro Shop
    Amtrak/Commuter Rail Trains

At 4

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Leave 4

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • The next stop will be Stop #5, The Old State House/Faneuil Hall.

BeTween 4 & 5

The Garden

  • Opened on September 30, 1995
  • Original opened November 17, 1928
  • 17-time World Champion Boston Celtics and parkay floor (easier to move)
    most recent in 2008 against the LA Lakers.
  • 6-time Stanley Cup Champion Boston Bruins
    most recent in 2011

Old Garden

  • Old Garden was located where the parking lot is in front of the TD Garden
  • First event, was a boxing match between Andre Routis of France and Dick “Honey Boy” Finnegan of Dorchester. (Finnegan won)
  • First Bruins game was in 1928;
  • First Celtics game was 1946.
  • Ice would steam up in the spring

Bobby Orr audio

Bobby Orr

  • Orr scored the winning goal in the Stanley Cup game 7, in overtime 1970 against the St. Louis Blues. It is based on a photo that was taken by Ray Lussier just after Orr had scored and then was tripped by Blues defenseman Noel Picard.
  • Bobby Orr # 4 played 10 years with the Bruins in 657 regular season games and in 74 playoff games.
  • After the 1972 Stanley Cup hockey exploded in Boston
  • 1980 Olympic winners were 9- 12 at the time

Other events

  • Ice-skating, gymnastic events, and high-school and college sports games and wrestling matches.
  • The circus came yearly
  • Many concerts are held here as well.
  • 1996 NHL All Star hockey game
  • 1998 WrestleMania
  • 2001 & 2014 US Figure Skating Championships
  • 2004 Democratic Convention
  • 2006 NCAA Women’s Final Four
  • 2010 the first MMA Event

My 1st concert was 1978—Stixx

I saw Queen in 1980
Van Halen
Police
Cars
Crosby Stills Nash and Young
Billy Joel
Todd Rundren
Tori Amos—but I didn’t buy the ticket

We are a hockey family

Bobby Orr—hockey rinks—1980 olympics

New England Sports Museum

  • Variety of Boston-area sports memorabilia & artifacts, plus frequent tours.

Some of my best friends are those fans

North Station

  • Hub Hall: authentically Boston 18 food & drink options.

Tip O’neil Bldg

  • Representative (filled in for JFK)
  • Speaker of the House, ‘77–’87
  • All Politics is Local

The West End

  • A late 1950s urban renewal project razed the west end and scolley square displacing over 20,000 people to redevelop the area. Today, much of the original area is non-residential.
  • Leonard Nemoy—Spock—is from hereconcef
  • Boston’s West End was much like the North End—a working poor residential area with scattered businesses and small meandering roads

Long Depression

  • 1920–1960
  • Shoe Manufacturing went south
  • Pianos replaced with radios
  • Garments declined (Wool capital of america)
  • Banks wouldn’t lend money to city because of corruption
  • Developers weren’t interested
  • An economic ghost town; stagnant, high tax rate
  • Shipping declined—not connected to main US railroads
  • Immigration declined—less unskilled or low skilled workers
  • Great Depression
  • No New Deal money—corruption
  • Suburban increase-malls, trains commuting, cars
  • Abandoned waterfront and rail yards
  • Old dilapidated homes
  • Massachusetts did well but not Boston
  • Ethnic rivalries between Irish and Protestants;
    Irish grew up with ‘No Irish need apply’ and relationship of gardners and stableboys—degrading social structure
  • Irish croneyism

New Boston—Hynes

  • In the 1950s, John B. Hynes and The BHA (BRA) wanted to create a “New Boston” because of decades of cronyism, neglect, economic decline and crumbling infrastructure
  • the federal government’s Housing Act of 1949 presented the opportunity to remake parts of Boston
  • First;
    Central Artery
    Waterfront
    New York Streets
    Scolly Sq
    Tunnel to East Boston
    Boston and Worcester RR
    and West End
  • Then;
    Boston Common Garage
    Barry Corner
    South End
    New Boston—Hynes

New Boston—Collins

West end redevelopment

  • The residents were told the redevelopment would be benefit the neighborhood. Narrow streets were a fire hazard and many of the buildings were not up to code.
  • The plan, however, completely leveled a portion of the West End and displaced 2,700 families. The result was residential high rises, shopping centers and parking lots to increase tax revenues.
  • Tenants were assured that affordable housing would be found for them, and many were led to believe that they would be able to move back into the West End after the project was complete.
  • The new development was aimed towards upper middle class residents: most of those displaced would not be able to afford to return.
  • Starting in 1957, the neighborhood was leveled
  • The Last Tenement House to survive the urban renewal, 42 Lomasney Way
  • Attacked by critics for its destruction of a neighborhood and its careless implementation.
  • One of the main criticisms of the project is that the neighborhood was not considered a slum by the residents, and instead had a strong sense of community.
  • The destruction of the West End community led to a strong distaste for urban renewal in Boston.

Gov’t Center

  • In 1960, the BRA gained 56 acres of land under the provision of Federal Urban Renewal legislation and began to develop the Government Center project.
  • This was one of the most ambitious and creative renewal projects in the country because it consolidated federal, state and city offices.
  • At the time due to the large displacement of residents from the West End area this was and is considered one of the worst examples of Urban Redevelopment in the country.
  • Originating with promise and optimism the project is now viewed as a failure both in design and effect on the City.

Museum of Science

  • Science museum and indoor zoo in Boston, Massachusetts, located in Science Park, spanning the Charles River.
  • 400 Exhibits, Omni theater, Charles Hayden planetarium

Hurley Bldg

  • 1970
  • the developers ran out of money and where never able to fully complete the building
  • Vacant lot for 20 years till the built this building

My father parked there

  • Riddled with serpentine corridors, dark alcoves and elaborate staircases to nowhere.
  • Police headquarters in the Departed with Mark Wahlberg, Matt Damon, Robert Wahlberg
  • Lindemann Mental Health Center

Brook Courthouse

  • Completed in 1999.
  • There are 18 courtrooms. The Massachusetts Land Court
  • First Black AG in Massachusetts
  • and in the United States from 1963 to 1966
  • First African American to be elected by popular vote to the U.S. Senate., 1967 to 1979.

Boston Public Market

  • Year-round indoor market with scores of vendors selling local produce, fish, gourmet treats & more.

Hay Market

  • One of America’s oldest open air markets on weekends
  • 1820
  • 40 independent vendors, historic pubs and restaurants, and ethnic groceries for fresh fruits, vegetables, and seafood.

Holocaust Memorial

  • Dedicated in October 22, 1995.
  • 6 towers can represent the chimneys of the six major Nazi concentration camps
  • The glass in each tower is etched with one million, seven-digit numbers, suggestive of the tattoos and to honor the six million people who were put to death
  • When walking through if you look down it appears that there are embers and ashes below the grates and smoke rises

BlackStone Block

  • This is the oldest commercial district in the city,
  • named after the first European settler in Boston, Reverend William Blackstone.
  • Once a waterfront business area. Due to the infill of land it is now slightly inland from the waterfront.
  • collection of commercial buildings dating from the late 18th and 19th centuries.
  • In 1983, the surrounding ca. 1676 Blackstone Block Street Network
  • To walk through the narrow streets and alleys gives you the feeling of what it was like to be in Boston during Colonial times.

Bell In Hand

  • Oldest continuously operated pub in the country, established in 1795.
  • The name refers to the original proprietor, Jimmy Wilson, who was Boston’s town crier until 1794.

Union Oyster

  • 1710s— National Historic Landmark building
  • opened in 1826, Oldest continuously operated restaurant in America.
  • Only 3 families have operated the restaurant.
  • Half round mahogany oyster bar, Daniel Webster sat daily
  • JFK’s booth is # 18.
  • The first toothpick in the United States used at the Union Oyster House in November of 1873.

Green Dragon Tavern

  • Established in 1654
  • The basement tavern was used by several secret groups and became known by historians as the “Headquarters of the Revolution”.
  • The Sons of Liberty led by Samuel Adams, Boston Committee of Correspondence and the Boston Caucus each met there.
  • Membership was secret, but included Samuel Adams, Dr. Joseph Warren, Paul Revere, John Hancock, James Otis, and Benjamin Edes (owner of the influential Boston Gazette).
  • The Boston Tea Party was planned there
  • Paul Revere (a Mason) was sent from there to Lexington on his famous ride.
  • The building was demolished in 1832.[5] A warehouse was subsequently built in its place.[2] On August 19, 1892, a commemorative plaque was placed:[5]

Curley Statues

  • 1980
  • 2 statues; Standing = powerful figure
    Sitting = friend to the Irish
  • four nonconsecutive terms as mayor, twice as congressman and once as governor.
  • He was in jail in 1904, when he was a city councilman, because he was caught taking a civil service exam for one of his constituents.
  • He was actually elected to the office of Alderman while serving this jail term.
  • Although he was somewhat dishonest, Curley is credited with many improvements in the city, including the expansion of Boston City Hospital.
  • In 1947, while mayor for the fourth time and in his last political office, he would serve time at a federal penitentiary for mail fraud.
  • Richard Joseph Daley—Chicago
    Jimmy Walker—New York
    Tom Pendergast—Kasas City
  • Curley Legacy;
    Fiscally irresponsible
    social rivalries
    Ethnic tension
    Regianl insecurity
    Parochialism
    Corruption
    Cronyismwest

My grandmother loved him. My father was impressed with his speaking. Saw him when he ws 10 and influenced him getting into politics.

City Hall

  • Offices of the mayor of Boston and the Boston City Council
  • The current hall was built in 1968 in the Brutalist architecture, part of the modernist movement.
  • Mixed opinions about it
  • When it was first completed it won several architectural awards
  • Nov of 2008 Boston City Hall was named by VirtualTourist.com the Ugliest Building in the World. It continues to make one or more of the world’s ugliest building lists yearly.

Customs House

  • constructed in 1837–47
  • The tower was added in 1913–15.

Quincy Market

  • Built 1824-1826,
  • Designed by Alexander Parris.
  • made of Quincy granite,
  • named after Mayor Josiah Quincy, mayor when they were built.
  • The whole area redeveloped in the 70’s.
  • Over 150 shops and restaurants.
  • Central corridor devoted entirely to food!
  • Some of the merchants sell their wares from replicas of the original bull carts used in the market for 150 years.
  • Today there are over 12 full restaurants and Pubs and 35 colonnade eateries.
  • Street entertainers
  • Lots of souveniers

Anything you could possible want with Boston is here

Faneuil Hall

  • A gift by a wealthy merchant named Peter Faneuil in 1742, to be for public use.
  • Faneuil Hall has been called “The Cradle of Liberty” many of the events that led up to the Revolution were discussed and debated here.
  • 1st floor is the public market
  • 2nd floor is the Great Hall, where the Sons of Liberty would meet for town meetings (Boston was a town) and debates and naturalizations.
  • 4th floor is the museum of the Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company.

Grasshopper w-vane

  • Copper and gold leaf and is a symbol of colonial prosperity.
  • During the War of 1812, anyone who claimed to be a Bostonian and did not know the shape of the weathervane was an imposter/spy!

The Ancient and Honorable Artillery Company of Mass

  • Oldest military organization in the Country
  • Founded in 1638.
  • 3rd oldest in the world (Swiss Guard of Rome and the Honorable Artillery Company of London)
  • Train the militia units for the defense of the colony.
  • The first Monday of June, the members elect their captain on the Boston Common a tradition dating back to 1638.

Sam Adams Statue

  • Mastermind of the Sons of Liberty, a major instigator of many of the events that led up to the American Revolution.
  • Served as Governor of Massachusetts from 1794-1797

State & Congress st

  • In 1630 the first Puritan settlers, led by John Winthrop, built their earliest houses

A city on a Hill

  • John Winthrop Dreamed of a City on a Hill, 1630 to describe the expectation that the Massachusetts Bay colony would shine like an example to the world.
  • when the Puritans came to Charlestown in 1630. After they discovered the water in Charlestown was brackish (salty) and the area was not really habitable (lots of mosquitoes), they took Reverend Blackstone (Blaxton\Blackstone, an Anglican minister and of a recluse, was the only European settler on the Shawmut Peninsula) up on his offer of moving across to the Shawmut Peninsula and settled in the North End area of Boston.
  • Winthrop built his house after moving across the Charles River from Charlestown
  • Greek Bank is site of the First Meeting House in Boston Built A.D. 1632
  • By 1636 the thoroughfare was known as Market Street.
  • Known as King’s Street
  • In the 19th century State Street became known as Boston’s primary location for banks and other financial institutions.

Old State House

  • 1713
  • oldest public building in Boston.
  • Wooden Town House that had been built in 1658, and burned down in a fire in 1711
    —also destroyed about 100 buildings in the area.
  • From the balcony, the Declaration of Independence was read to Bostonians, for the first time on July 18, 1776.
  • Read every year on Fourth of July
  • A museum
  • Colonial Government,
    the Massachusetts Assembly
    Royal Governor presided from here,
    Boston’s town government
    Massachusetts’ state government
    City Hall for Boston.
  • Queen Elizabeth II stood on the balcony at the Bicentennial Celebration on July 11, 1976. In a speech that she gave on that day, the Queen said that Paul Revere, Samuel Adams and other Patriots would be very surprised to see her there.

Before 5

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #5
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Old State House
    Quincy Market
    Old South Meeting House
    Quincy Market/Faneuil Hall
    Downtown Crossing

At 5

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

To get to Harvard, study. but it is quicker if you take the train

Leave 5

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • The next stop will be stop #7, The Charles Street Meeting House/Antique Row. We will not be going by stop 6.

Tween 5 & 7

Washington Street

  • in honor of George Washington
  • was the first road to connect the small peninsular town of Boston to the mainland
  • streets change names as they cross it, except Mass Ave and Columbus Ave

Boston Massacre

  • Cobblestone circle is the site to commemorate the Boston Massacre March 5, 1770

Pre-events

  • British soldiers occupied Boston since 1768 to support the British officials because of the trouble causes by the taxes from the Townsend Acts.
  • There were altercations and protests over the years. This was the first time deadly force was used.

The event

  • The trouble started at 3 blocks down at the Custom House. A single sentry on duty —Pvt White— was harassed by locals
  • Hundreds of Bostonians were out because of a small fire in the neighborhood. A church bell was rung normally as a fire alarm on weekdays
  • The nights guard came out—8 pvts and Captian Preston
  • They all moved up to the townhouse at this site.

Bells

  • By this time hundreds of Bostonians were out because the bell was being rung again.
  • Rocks and snowballs flew. The crowd became agitated with verbal exchanges and taunts being tossed back and forth by both sides.
  • People kept yelling “Fire!”
  • One soldier — Hugh Montgomery — was hit in the head by a club and fell to the ground. He fired into the crowd in a panic.
  • Soon, more shots followed and 2 colonials lay dead, 3 died later

Aftermath

  • John Adams (2nd Cousin of Sam Adams) defended the nine British soldiers brought to trial. All pleaded self-defense, 7 were acquitted, and 2 were found guilty of manslaughter. Both men were branded on the thumb with an M.
  • For the 5 who died, it was horrible. But, it wasn’t very massacery—sorry massacre victims
  • But the Patriots used this event as propaganda against the British to further their cause. They published pamphlets and made protests, Each year there were speeches and dinners to commemorate the event.
  • This event caused colonists to question their Englishness and started to turn their sentament against the King.
  • Colonists started to question their Englishness and started the turn their sentament against the King.

Colonial Jail

  • Opened in 1635
  • Soldiers from the Boston Massacre
  • So many people charged with witchcraft during the Salem trials many were sent here to Boston to await trail
  • Captain William Kidd was here 1699 before being sent back to England to be tried, convicted and hung for piracy.

What’s the pirates favorite letter—the C

steaming kettle

  • 1873
  • Part of Scollay Square
  • Originally an advertising sign for the Oriental Tea Company

Tremont St

  • A variation of one of the original names of the city, “Trimountaine”
  • Reference to a hill that had 3 peaks used to expand Shawmut Peninsula. Pemberton Hill, Mt. Vernon, and Beacon Hill.

Kings chapel burial ground

  • Oldest in Boston, 1630
  • William Dawes, famous midnight ride
  • John Winthrop, the first governor of the Mass Bay Colony
  • Mary Chilton, the first woman to step off the Mayflower onto Plymouth Rock,
  • The oldest remaining tombstone in downtown Boston ,William Paddy, 1658.
  • The Cage is not for devils and goblins, but for the subway

Tremont Temple

  • first integrated church in the Country in 1839; Blacks and Whites could share the same pew.
  • 1st church in Boston not to sell pews by subscription
  • The congregation bought the former building on this site, also named the Tremont Temple; it was a famous Boston theater.
  • Charles Dickens read from A Christmas Carol here in December 1867, and people lined up in the cold for hours, waiting to buy tickets.
  • The Black Nativity is performed here yearly.

Granary Burial Ground

  • 3 signers of the declaration of Independance;
  • Samuel Adams

Great Baked Beans in the Beantown Pub

The only place on earth you can toast Sam Adams with a Sam Adams

  • beside him to the left 5 men killed in the Boston Massacre.
  • Robert Treat Paine.
  • John Hancock (his gravestone is the tall one against the church)
  • Popular legend states that he signed his name bigger than everyone else’s so that the “fat old King could read it without his spectacles”
  • “Franklin” is the marker for Ben Franklin’s parents.
  • Paul Revere is buried towards the back.
  • Elizabeth Goose commonly known as America’s Mother Goose, her son-in-law in 1719 printed her nursery rhymes.
  • James Otis: “Taxation without Representation is Tyranny.” From a speech before the British Court in Massachusetts regarding the Writs of Assistance.
  • 9 former governors of Massachusetts Bay Colony

Park Street Church

  • Completed in 1810, on the site of the town granary.
  • Old Granary was where grain was stored for the town.
  • On these steps on July 4, 1831 a children’s choir sang “America” (My Country ‘tis of Thee) for the first time. written by Dr. Samuel Francis Smith

America.

  • Park St. Church was the tallest building in the U.S. from 1810 to 1845 and the tallest building in Boston till 1867.

1st Subway

  • horse drawn street cars, then all electric and converged on downtown to create havoc
  • Park street to Arlington—1897
  • Park Street to North Station—1898
  • Elevated to Charlestown 1901
  • To East Boston 1904
  • To Roxbury 1908
  • London, Glasgow, Budapest

Boston Common

  • Oldest public park in America
  • Purchased by the Puritans from William Blackstone in 1634, an Anglican minister and of a recluse, was the only European settler on the Shawmut Peninsula
  • Of the original 50 acres, 48 acres remain as a park to this date,
  • The Puritans taxed themselves 6 shillings from each household for a total of 30 pounds to pay for this land,
  • used for among other things as a common area for cattle grazing and a training-ground for the militia.
  • Use for public hangings until 1817.
  • Cattle on the Common were disallowed in 1830
  • Military exercises
  • Parkman Bandstand, had many concerts such as conductor was John Phillips Sousa and Shakespeare in the Park.
  • Planted trees in early 1720s as a Mall
  • Paved paths firein 1830s for a park

beacon hill

  • Named for a beacon —a pole with tart in a bucket—that was once placed on its top to warn of the coming of pirates and other enemies. The Beacon was never lit.

Bullfinch development, 1830—1870

  • Nichols House-55 Mt Vernon is a museum
  • Smith Court-Holmes Alley has a fake house front
  • 5 Pickney Street is oldest house
  • 87 Mt Vernon is Bulfinch house
  • Up Mt Vernon/Pinckney St. is a private square— Louisburg Square, Boston’s most exclusive neighborhood. John Kerry, Former Secretary of State, resides up in Louisburg Square.

Acorn St

  • One of the most photographed streets in the city

Athens of America—1820s–1850s

  • Boston Brahmins-40 tight knit, elite, genteel, highly educated, wealthy families
  • Wealth from shipping and manufacturing around new england
  • The new America developed it’s own writing style and by mid century, Boston was a leader in the American Renassaince
  • Social reformers for poor and alcoholics and women and crime, abolistionists, suffragets, Transcendentalists

Famous residence

  • Sylvia Plath—9 willow
  • Robert Frost—88 Mt Vernon
  • Louisa May Alcott—20 Pickney St
  • Nathanial Hawthorne—54 Pickney
  • Henry David Thoroue

State House

  • designed in 1795 by Charles Bulfinch.
  • Bulfinch also designed the State Capitals in Maine and Connecticut and the Capital Building in Wash D.C.
  • 15 white horses, one for each state, pulled the cornerstone up the hill where Governor Samuel Adams and Paul Revere presided over its laying.
  • The total cost of construction was $133,333.33. This by the way was way over budget
  • The building was completed and open for service in 1797.
  • The cod became a symbol of pride and a carving of a cod. The Sacred Cod can be found in the House Chamber at the State House and the House will not meet if the Sacred Cod is not present.
  • The Senate Chamber houses the Holy Mackerel a carving of the Mackerel.

Gold Dome

  • originally wooden whitewashed shingles.
  • shingles leaked, so in 1802 the dome was covered with copper from Paul Revere’s copper rolling mill
  • gilded in 1861.

Gov stuff, colonist stuff, patriot stuff

Mary Dyer Statue

  • A Quaker.
  • The Puritans banned her 3 times
  • Return a 4th time, hanged on Boston Common in1660.
  • A tribute to her bravery for religious freedom. This shows the lack of tolerance that the Puritans had for other religions.

Bullfinch Eagle

  • Designed by Bulfinch in 1789 for the American Revolution.
  • The 60-foot height is the original hieght
  • The hill was used for landfill projects
  • On the site of the original Beacon for which the hill is named—a large bucket of tar on a tall pole that could be lit and used as a signal to warn the surrounding areas of Indian, pirate or foreign country attack. The Beacon was never lit!

Mass Fallen Firefighters Memorial

  • Dedicated in 2007
  • Displayed 870 names, as of September 2014

Mass Law Enforcement Memorial

  • 340 names of law enforcement officers who lost their lives in the line of duty inscribed on the memorial.

122 Bowdoin st, JFK

JFK Speech

  • John F. Kennedy’s voting address
  • from the time he was elected to Congress in 1946 till he was killed in Dallas.
  • The actual apartment is over the coffee shop, #36.
  • This is part of the 11th Congressional district
  • his nephew Joe Kennedy (Robert Kennedy’s oldest son) also represented Mass 4th—brookline
  • John Fitzgerald Mass house of reps
  • Voted at Old West Church

Scollay Square

  • Red light district—pubs, taverns, tattoo parlors, burlesque theaters, arcades, nightclubs and amusement centers.
  • Well known by sailors and soldiers from all over the world.
  • Old Howard Theatre;
    Fanny Brice, Abbott & Costello, Phil Silvers, Marx Brothers.
  • In 1962 the entire area was demolished for the new government center project.

Alex Graham Bell

  • His laboratory where he perfected the telephone
  • Rumour was he wanted to invent an intercome so he didn’t have to get up to talk to his wife.
  • The building was torn down in 1920, but the phone company here in Boston took apart the laboratory and reassembled it in their lobby in the financial district.
  • the word decibel, a measurement for sound, come from Bell’s name

What is his 2nd greatest invention? The 2nd telephone.

old west church

  • 1737 a wooden church structure was built
  • In the 1770’s the British used the building to house soldiers here in Boston. I
  • 1775, British destroyed the building. they thought the steeple was being used for communication between Colonial sympathizers in Boston and the Continental Army in Cambridge.
  • current church built in 1806.
  • 1960’s a branch of the Boston Public Library and a polling place and on Election Day in 1960, JFK accompanied by his wife Jackie cast his vote
  • Now a day care center

Harrison Gray otis house

  • Designed by Charles Bulfinch
  • built 1795-1796.
  • Three houses that Bulfinch designed for Otis on Beacon Hill.
  • Mayor of Boston, U.S. Senator and a descendent of James Otis

Beacon Hill North Slope

  • Prior to the Civil War Boston had the largest population of Free Blacks in America.
  • One of the stops on the Underground Railroad.
  • The Abolitionist Movement started here.
  • The Black Heritage Trail is a walking tour through Beacon Hill. Houses and alleys that served as stops on the Underground Railroad as well as homes of prominent Black residents.

MGH

  • Founded in 1811
  • One of the best in the world.
  • the city’s largest employer providing over 14,000 jobs
  • The largest hospital based research program in the U.S.
  • First successful appendectomy—1886
  • Severed limb was reattached—1962.
  • First Department of Social Services—1905
  • First used in a medical school’s training program—Harvard University

Eather Dome

  • Down North Anderson Street is the surgical amphitheater known as the Ether Dome, designed by Charles Bulfinch
  • Between 1821 and 1868, more than 8,000 operations were performed in the Ether Dome. Today it is a teaching amphitheater and historical landmark.
  • Dr. William Morton, 1846, demonstrated the first public surgery using anesthetic (ether)

Charles St jail

  • 1851 in the shape of a cross, which allowed for every cell to have daylight at some point during the day.
  • closed in 1973.
  • The building is now the Liberty Hotel.
  • former jail in their décor
  • restaurants named the Clink and the Catwalk
  • bar named the Alibi that is in the original ‘Drunk Tank”.
  • Used to have to pay to get out. Now you pay to get in.

Charles St STation

  • How to get to Cambridge
  • MBTA Red Line to Harvard Sq Station

Longfellow bridge

  • 1910
  • replacing the Old West Bridge, which was built in 1793.
  • named for the poet
  • “Salt and Pepper Bridge,” because the support structures resemble old-fashioned salt and pepper shakers.
  • This bridge crosses the Charles River, which separates Boston from Cambridge.

Charles river

  • Boundary between Boston and Cambridge;
  • In 1614, Captain John Smith (of Pocahontas fame) originally named the river the Massachusetts River (after the local Indian Tribe). The name was changed to the Charles River by then Prince Charles who, in 1625, became King Charles I.

Play Dirty Water

Cambridge

  • MIT
  • Squares
  • Harvard Square has restaurants, shops and things to do
  • How do you get to Harvard? Study or just take the red line.

Charles street

Savenors

  • best in prime beef, heritage pork, domestic lamb, naturally raised poultry, and game
  • Place where Julia Child (The french Chef) shopped

Auntie Murph was a horrible cook. One day it was great “I went to Savanors’.

I figured if I shopped there everything would taste great. No one told me you needed talent too.

That 19th centruy Charm

  • The Flat of Beacon Hill—filled in 1805
  • Antique Row; there are over 30 antique shops and consignment stores
  • To the right was a tidal marsh; this area was filled in with dirt from the top of the hill to extend Beacon Hill.
  • The street to retain their 19th century charm
  • You’ll notice that you don’t see neon signs or electric lights on the outside of any of the buildings. many of the shopkeepers maintain the medieval tradition of putting a symbol of what they sell on their signs.
  • Legend has it that these lamps have been lit 365 days a year, 24 hours a day since 1912 when the city fired the lamplighter because it was cheaper to leave the lamps running than to pay him every day!
  • All the other original buildings on the right side of the street had 8 to 10 feet of their fronts removed to accommodate the process of widening the street.

Before 7

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #7
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Charles Street Meeting House
    Antique Row
    Beacon Hill

At 7

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Call dispatch

Leave 7

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • The next stop will be Stop # 8 The Cheers Bar

BeTween 7 & 8

charles st meeting house

  • Building was moved 15 feet to the right towards the Charles River, when Charles Street was widened.
  • This is reflected on the cornerstone with the dates 1921\1807.
  • Baptisms were performed in the Charles River right out the door of the church before the landfill project

Mt Vernon ST

  • Up Mt Vernon/Pinckney St. is a private square— Louisburg Square, Boston’s most exclusive neighborhood. John Kerry, Former Secretary of State, resides up in Louisburg Square.
  • Original Mansions and museums

Delucas Market

  • We’re a historic, family-owned specialty grocery store

boston strangler

  • One of the scariest times in Boston History happen up ahead.
  • In the early 1960s, 13 women were killed by the Boston Strangler.
  • His last victim, Mary Sullivan, was found dead in the second floor apartment above the Paramount Deli, on January 4, 1964.
  • The police arrested Albert DeSalvo, and he was conviced of the murders.
  • However, his guilt remains a mystery to this day.
  • If you would like to hear more about this and many other stories of the “darker” side of Boston you might be interested in the Ghost & Gravestones Tour. It runs April through October and is by reservation only so call for dates and times. It is part on the trolley and part walking through a couple of the burial grounds in Boston. Please see a sales rep or me at the end of the tour for more information.

Boston Common

  • Oldest

Boston Public Garden

  • Oldest
  • Before the light changes

Cheers

Before 8

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #8
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Don’t Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Cheers
    Boston Public Garden

At 8

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Leave 8

Next Stop

  • The next stop will be Stop #9, the Prudential Center

BeTween 8 & 9

Bull & Finch

  • NBC wanted to create a new sit-com based on a typical American neighborhood bar. After visiting half a dozen bars around the Boston, because of our reputation for sports and politics being very hot issues in bars, they chose this one as their setting for the show.

Cheers

  • September 30, 1982
  • top-rated show for the next 12 seasons.
  • The inside of the bar doesn’t look like the TV show;
  • filmed on a soundstage in Hollywood.
  • all the exterior shots were taken here in Boston.
  • exact replica set bar on the second floor here at Cheers where they do know your name.

Did they know your name?

I had a cruch on Dianne. But, my celebrity girlfriend was Stevie Nicks.

Did I tell you about my Uncle Murph? I’m not gonna drink anymore...

Esplanade, Hatch shell

  • The Charles River to the right
  • A park along the river so people walk, jog, bike or picnic
  • the Hatch Memorial Shell, an outdoor concert and movie theatre.
  • On the 4th of July, Keith Lockhart and the Boston Pops give their free concert.
  • 1812 overture introduced by Arthur Feilder. Requested it year after year.
  • 1/2 million people in attendance in boats on the Charles River, and along its banks on both sides of the Charles River

And fireworks...

1812 Overture

Back Bay

  • Arlington St

Intro

  • In front of us is the Back Bay. Back Bay is one of the largest examples of Victorian style Rowhouses in the country.
  • This is one of my favorite part of the city. I love the architecture here. And I love the history of this neighborhood.
  • Take a look at the windows, doors, stairs, and fences. Mansard roof, which is where the roofline extends down over the top floor, it was a fashionable style coming out of France at the time. Also each foor was taxed so it cut down on taxes
  • Gibson House

Gibson House

  • The house was completed in 1860
  • Charles Hammond Gibson died in 1954 and left his house and original furnishings as a museum.
  • It’s a time capsule of domestic life in Victorian Boston in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries

The Name

  • Called Back Bay because up until the early 1800s, is was the back of Boston harbor. Boston harbor was in the east, then the peninsular of Boston and the Back Bay.
  • It’s where 3 rivers emptied to create the Charles River basin. It started around Cheers and went 1 mile in front of us and 1/2 mile South—600 acres.
  • The section you see today was the largest landfill project in the US in the 18th century for comm and residential purposes.

Started with the Mill dam

  • The Charles river is a tidal river. 200 years ago, this area would fill with water at high tide and empty at low tide.
  • Also, it took trash, sewerage and debris with it each time.
  • In 1821, a Dam was built in hopes to power 80 Mills. But it only created enough power for 4 Mills.
  • It was an economic failure. Many investors lost a lot of money
  • The actual earthwork and seawall of the dam can still be found under Beacon Street.

Boston changes—1830s–1840s

  • POLLUTION: The dam cut this area off from the tides that cleaned all the sewerage that was poured into the river. So it became a cesspool and a health hazard.
  • Industrial revloution: Bostonians became rich off mills in East Mass.
  • RAILROADS: created more congestion and pollution
  • MORE FACTORIES, LESS LIVING SPACE
  • IRISH POTATO FAMINE; 200k Irish arrive in a 5 year period desperately poor, and suffering from starvation and disease and overwhelm the city. Pop 1845—99k, 1880—383k
  • The Irish should have gone to any other city in the World than Boston. It was the most unwelcoming place on earth for them. The residents here were known as the Boston Brahims—50 rich Yankee Protestants families decendant from the Puritans who were highly educated and politically connected.
  • EXODUS OF NATIVES: Population was growing BUT Bostonians fleed the city. Protestant getting away from the overcrowdedness, the pollution, and the Irish. Street cars made it easy to commute

Boston crisis—late 1840s-1850s

  • Diseases were caused by stagnant Mill Dam, so they thought.
  • Exodus was taking taxes $ with them
  • Foriegn population must be prevented from dominating Boston—Irish = 47% population

city planning-grids

  • To solve these problems, a landfill project was conceived as an exclusive, residential-only area for Boston’s wealthy citizen—filling in the Back Bay
  • Gilman designed it. George Goss and Norman Munson developed it
  • They employed a brand new philosophy in city planning called...city planning. Unlike downtown Boston.
  • Downtown Boston was a colonial style town. They say the street were paved over old cow paths. Streets were not planned, they just happened. They had to work around the lanscape. The shortest or easiest route to a place became the road.
  • The Back Bay was laid out in a grid like pattern with the main streets running east and west and
  • Every street crossing it north and south is in alphabetical order beginning at the Public Garden with Arlington and going west,

landfill

  • This was the largest landfill project in the 18th century—600 acres
  • Start in 1857, trains 24/7 delivered landfill from Needham, Mass.–14 miles west by train. People believed diseases came from dirt and garbage. So, you had to use the right earth.
  • The Steam shovels would distribute the land—two new inventions of the time
  • Starting by Arlington Street, block by block was filled in from 1857 to 1890.
  • This was called the ‘New Land’.

Brownstones

  • As soon as they were avaible, lots were bought by weathy Bostonians and built their homes. They owned from top to bottom.
  • Nineteenth-century technology used a system of submerged timbers provided an understructure for most South End buildings. Each home had 2000 wood pilings to keep it from sinking into the mud. These were full trees from a forest in Maine.
  • The brownstone is a stone that was found abundantly along the Connecticut Valley River it was porous and easily carved.
  • Land set aside for culture—library, museum, setc
  • Commercial buildings were permitted from around 1890

Life style

  • These were the wealthies families in Massachustts. Servants lived on the top floors and worked in the cellar. Similar to Downton Abby or Howards End until WW1
  • Most servants were Irish

Only talk to us to say “Hey Paddy, you missed a spot.”

20th century

  • 1920s cars cause people to leave the city.
  • 1930s—1960s great economic depression in Boston
  • 1960s-1970s—New Boston; Prudential built a building in Boston and started the turn around. The Mall at Pru tried to bring people back to the city from the suburban malls.

Today

  • Most are apartments, condos, dormitory, colleges and universities, museums, modern buildings, high end shopping, galleries, and social clubs in the once magnificent mansions.
  • federally protected area so the exteriors cannot be changed.
  • Water table need to stay high so wood pilings don’t rot out. Older drainage pipes are leaking and causing it to go down
  • Mass Ave

Former Residence

  • Isabella Stewart Gardner address is no longer in existance here on Beacon Street
  • Tom Brady

You think I care, I don’t care.

  • Booker Mansion and dog

Citgo sign

  • Citgo Services sign was located on the same site it had been installed in 1945.
  • A landmark here in Boston since 1965
  • nationally recognized from its appearances on TV during Red Sox baseball games.
  • 2005 the sign’s neon was replaced with LED.

BU

  • In Kenmore Square, start of Boston University campus.
  • founded in 1839.
  • The school mascot; the Boston Terrier his name is Rhett.

Church court condos

  • TA church until 1978, when a fire destroyed the interior
  • the congregation sold to Architects
  • Now a condo complex

Mass Ave

  • Goes out to Lexington and Concord
  • Follows British troop movement April 1775

Harvard Bridge

  • The Massachusetts Avenue Bridge, called the Harvard Bridge.
  • On the Cambridge side of the Harvard Bridgeis M.I.T.!
  • The Harvard Bridge was built before M.I.T. move to Cambridge in 1916. this was the most direct route from Boston to Harvard University.

smoots

Since we are this close to MIT, lets do some math. Put your math hat on.
The Bridge is 24,414 inches, how many feet is that? — 2,034 feet.
How many yards? —678 yards.
How many meters?—?
How many Smoots?—364.4 and an ear

  • The bridge is measured on the sidewalk.
  • These date back to 1958.
  • Oliver Smoot was a freshman attending M.I.T. in 1958.
  • he was pledging the fraternity, so he had to measure the Harvard Bridge with an unknown form of measurement.
  • He chose his body. He lay on the sidewalk and with the help of some friends the spot was marked and he went up and down, up and down, up and down eventually lifted or dragged up and down the entire length of the bridge.
  • The official measurement is written on the sidewalk at either end of the bridge, it is 364.4 SMOOTS plus an ear! In case you’re wondering, a SMOOT is exactly sixty-seven inches his ear is considered “confidential” information.
  • the Cambridge police department requested that the markings stay, as they were routinely used in police reports to identify locations on the bridge.

ames mansion

  • Original design was by H.H. Richardson,
  • The home was built by Oliver Ames, whose family made their money in shovel manufacturing. From 1887-1890 Oliver Ames served as governor of Massachusetts.
  • Ames Shovels were first made here in Massachusetts in 1774 and are still produced to this day. Ames is one of the country’s oldest companies.

Comm Ave

  • Main street through the back bay
  • The park that runs down the middle: the Commonwealth Mall.
  • There are many statues in the Mall: Alexander Hamilton, Samuel Eliot Morrison and even a former Argentina President Domingo Sarmiento.
  • The architecture along the street is beautiful and diverse.
  • considered by Winston Churchill to be one of the prettiest streets in the world

emerald necklace

  • This park is a link in the Emerald Necklace, which is the park system designed in part by Frederick Law Olmsted.
  • The Necklace consists of a string of 9 continuous parks starting at the Boston Common and continuing through the Public Garden, stretching up the Commonwealth Mall to the Back Bay Fens to the Riverway, Olmsted Park, Jamaica Pond, Arnold Arboretum and Franklin Park a total of approximately 7 miles.

harvard club

  • founded in 1908, by 3 alumni of Harvard
  • In 1921 they built their building here on Commonwealth Ave.

eliot hotel

  • Built 1925
  • Hosted the Boston Marathon’s Pasta Dinner for the runners the evening before the race.
  • Now the dinner is held at one of the convention centers.

Newbury street

  • Over 300 shops and restaurants, including exclusive men and women’s shops, art galleries, antique stores,elegant boutiques, bookstores, hair salons, restaurants, cafes and hotels.
  • Shreve, Crump & Low, is the oldest purveyor of luxury goods in North America, responsible for trophies such as the Davis Cup and the Cy Young Award.
  • beautiful 19th century brownstones.
  • because of its numerous upscale boutiques and shops, it has earned a reputation as one of the most expensive streets in the world
  • This is the street to “see and be seen on” here in Boston

International Poster store

Fenway Park

  • oldest professional baseball fields in the United States.
  • 2004, 2007 & 2013 World Series Champions, the Boston Red Sox.

Carlton Fisk

Sweet Caroline

  • built in 1912
  • Prior to 2004 World Series victory; the Red Sox had not won the series since 1918.
  • You can tour Fenway’s field and stands and see the manual score board that is still in use.
  • It is a short 10-minute walk down to Fenway from our next stop.
  • Fenway Park’s winning opening day game over the New York Highlanders, (later to become the dreaded New York Yankees).
  • Another unique feature of the park is the 37- foot left field wall known affectionately as “the Green Monster”.
  • Babe Ruth
    Cy Young
    Ted Williams
    Carl Yaz
    David Ortiz
    Roger Clemens
  • Fenway hosts Frozen Fenway addition to the hockey games and open skate sessions sledding and tubing is here.

symphony hall

  • Built in 1900
  • home to the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Boston Pops.
  • A Harvard physicist by the name of Wallace Clement Sabine (Say-Bine), helped design the building to ensure that it had great acoustics. The seats and tables in the hall are original and cannot be changed due to the design for the acoustics. Seats can be repaired or recovered but that is all.
  • Street noise cannot be heard due to the box within a box design of the Hall.
  • Symphony Hall is particularly popular during the holiday season for the world-famous Boston Pops Holiday Concerts.

Berklee Performance Center &
the Berklee College of Music

  • largest independent music college in the country
  • 4400 students.
  • As of 2021 a total of 310 Grammys have been award to alumni with an addition 108 Latin Grammys received.
  • Some of the famous alumni include:
    Quincy Jones, John Mayer,
    Bruce Hornsby, Pat Methany,
    Paula Cole, Melissa Etheridge,
    Branford Marsalis Meghan Trainer,
    some members of Aerosmith
    Imagine Dragons.
  • Lawrence Berk founded Berklee in 1945; he named it after his son Lee.
  • Lawrence and Lee both served as presidents of Berklee.

My aunt wanted to be a singer. She was horrible. One day my sister finally said “Auntie Murph, You should sing solo. Solo that noone can hear you.”

the pru

  • Computer industry was taking off, take advantage of tech boom in 1960s, made to resemble a cmputer board
  • This is the second tallest building in Boston.
  • 749 52 floors 1964
  • The building was completed in 1965, not only was it the tallest building in Boston, but it was the tallest building on the mainland United States (Since Manhattan is an island.
  • The ‘New Boston’
  • Developed the new service econmoy—health, research, finance, education, high tech, tourism—white callar

Boston fire station

  • The Boston Fire Department was founded in 1678, first paid municipla department
  • Engine 33, Ladder 15 is the oldest active firehouse.
  • This station was built in 1888 using the Richardson Romanesque architectural style.
  • 1st in the world to use the telegraph for emergency, 1851. The first fire alarm was transmitted via the Fire Alarm Telegraph system on April 29, 1852.

Hynes Convention Center

Before 9

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Prudential Center,
    Newbury St.
    Hynes Convention Center,
    Hilton Hotel
    Sheraton Hotel
    the Christian Science Center
    Mapparium.

Beatles Number 9

At 9

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

dispatch with seat count

7th ining stretch

Contest— 2 players-Lightning round
3 questions by other guests
win a prize
I’ll have a hat and a fake microphone (to fool the guests)
Easy and hard questions
“the oldest space in US is in what city, Boston”
“what was the population of Boston in 1626”
7Billion

Awards for Furthest/answer question

Beatles Number 9

Leave 9

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • The next stop will be Stop #10 the Christian Science Center,
    MFA
    Gardner

BeTween 9 & 10

Sheraton/4 seasons

  • Largest hotel in Boston
  • 3rd tallest building—61 floors—742 feet—2019

Church of Christ, Science HQ

  • This religion was founded by Mary Baker Eddy in 1866
  • The plaza—the fountain, the reflecting pool and the newer buildings—built in 1972, designed by I.M. Pei
  • Mother church is actually two churches in one built in 1894.
  • Tours are available of this incredible piece of architecture; check at the library for times.
  • The Mary Baker Eddy Library for the Betterment of Humanity.
  • Mapparium; 30-foot-stained glass globe of the world that you can walk inside geographical boundaries since 1935
  • Publishing building for The Christian Science Monitor.
  • On Feb. 1, 1866 Mrs. Eddy fell in Lynn MA., received serious injuries and was bed-ridden.
  • She asked for her Bible and while reading she healed herself and claimed this date for when she discovered Christian Science.

ymca

  • first in United States founded in 1851
  • Retired Sea Captain Thomas Sullivan was concerned about the moral dangers to young sailors on shore leave, he and six other men founded the Boston YMCA
  • 1896 the Evening Institute of Young Men was founded this would later become Northeastern University.

Huntington Ave

  • “Avenue of the Arts”

MFA

  • John Singleton Copley,
    Winslow Homer,
    John Singer Sergeant
    Childe Hassam
    Fitz Henri Lane
    many impressionist artists
    wide variety of all types of artists.
  • A least one large visiting exhibit each year covering a wide variety of art styles.
  • 3/4 of a mile
  • Egyptian artifacts
  • large collection of Japanese swords.

Gardner museum

  • once a private house now a museum with some wonderful pieces of art blooming with life in all seasons
  • The galleries are filled with sculptures, tapestries, furniture and decorative arts from cultures all over the world.
  • Italian villa complete with an enclosed courtyard.
  • Remained pretty much unchanged since Mrs. Jack’s death in 1924.
  • We have been told if your name is Isabella, you get in for free.
  • The 1990 theft of 13 works of art from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum’s collection remains unsolved.
    Degas, Rembrant, Vermeer, Manet

Before 10

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #4
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Christian Science Center
    Boston Symphony Hall
    Mary Baker Eddy Library
    the Museum of Fine Arts
    Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

At 10

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Call Marriot Copley

Leave 10

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • Next stop is #11 the Copley Place Mall/Copley Marriott Hotel

BeTween 10 & 11

The pru center

  • There are over 75 shops and eateries,
  • Sak’s Fifth Avenue,
    Vineyard Vines
    Lululemon
  • the Cheesecake Factory
    Wagamama
  • Eataly, an Italian Marketplace;
    4 restaurants;
    butchers
    Fish monger
    Pasta
    chocolate bar
    cheese shop
    a bakery
    a salad bar
    sweets, spreads and jams, hundreds of olive oils, and a housewares section
    a book store
    a cooking school
  • leaders in Boston were trying to get people back into Boston to shop, instead of going to suburban malls. Took from downtown.

Before 11

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #11
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Copley Place Shopping Mall
    Prudential Center
    Copley Square Hotel
    Lenox Hotel
    Boston Copley Marriott

At 11

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Leave 11

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • Next is Stop # 12 the Copley Square Trinity Church

Tween 11 & 12

copley place

  • 2 hotels (the Westin and the Copley Marriott), buildings, the shopping center, apartments
  • 75 fabulous stores including;
    Neiman Marcus,
    Barneys New York,
    Tiffany & Co.,
    Jimmy Choo,
    Louis Vuitton
  • Walkway connects the 2 the Westin Hotel

John singleton copley

  • Born in 1738—Irish immigrant parents—Limerick and Clare
  • First great American portrait artist.
  • He painted the likenesses of John Hancock, Paul Revere and Samuel Adams
  • He also did portraits of many of the prominent Colonial and Tory people.
  • Between 1753- 1774 Copley painted about 350 portraits
  • Colonists wanted English style art, and elite culture. Any thing from the colonys looked provincial.
  • Colonial artists needed to go to Europe in order to advance their careers and perfect their skills. Benjamin West did.
  • Though born in Boston he was a loyalist. His loyalties were not with the colonies and he left for England prior to the Revolution.
  • continued to enjoy a very successful portrait-painting career in England, never returning to Boston.
  • Many of his works can be seen at the MFA

Boston Artists

fairmount hotel

  • 1912
  • Symbol of Boston’s rich history and elegance since it opened.
  • Sits on the former site of the Museum of Fine Arts.
  • Prior to it being here in its own building the Museum was housed in the Athenaeum in Beacon Hill.

bpl

  • established in 1848
  • The oldest, large, free lending public library in the country.
  • 30 million items!
  • This building was built from 1887 - 1895
  • The library has some wonderful works of art;
    Augustus and Louis Saint-Gaudens,
    Daniel Chester French,
    John Singleton Copley,
    Winslow Homer,
    John Singer Sargent
  • A Presidential Library of John Adams, the second President
  • Marble stairs, lion scultures
  • Courtyard in the middle
  • Cafe and Bar inside

Old south church

  • 1875
  • The original tower was 246 feet tall but the landfill here in Back Bay could not support the weight of it. As a result, the massive structure began to lean and by 1931(56 years), it was 3 feet out of line. It was necessary to construct a new, shorter tower.

Boston MArathon

  • Finish line in front
  • the world’s oldest annual marathon
  • Inspired by Athens Olympics, 1896
  • 1st modern Olympic gold medal won by James Connoly in triple jump
  • traditionally held on Patriots’ Day, the 3rd Monday of April.
  • Begun with 15 participants in 1897, the event was inspired by the success of the first marathon in the 1896 Summer Olympics.
  • The event attracts 500,000 spectators each year,
  • Now about 30,000 registered participants each year
  • Statues in Copley Square.

I don’t run though. I did once, camping. I was with my cousin Murph. We saw a bear. I slow put my sneakers on. He said, ‘You’ll never out run that bear’.

Copley Square

Marathon monument

  • Embedded in the sidewalk with all the names and times of the winners of the Marathon in all the divisions.
  • There is also a map include of the towns and route of race.
  • Nearby is the Tortoise and the Hare sculpture is located in Copley Square fountain to commemorate the race.

trinity church

  • one of the ten most beautiful churches in the United States acording to Achitectural Digest.

Not just cause I think so. Architectural Digest syas so too

  • It was dedicated in 1877
  • designed by Henry Hobson Richardson
  • Since the church sits on landfill, it is supported by 4500 wooden pilings; 2000 of which are in a 90 square foot area supporting the foundations of the great lantern tower that is believed to weigh 12 million pounds.
  • Since the pilings must be kept saturated at all times, water levels are checked regularly by an electronic sensing system.
  • You can tour the church.

Rev Philip Brooks Statute

  • Sculptors Augustus Saint-Gaudens and Frances Grimes
  • wrote “Oh Little town of Bethlehem”
  • Phillips Brooks / preacher of the word of god / lover of mankind / born in boston ad mdcccxxxv / died in boston ad mdcccxciii / this monument is erected by / his fellow citizens ad mcmx

Hancock Tower

  • Built 1975
  • Tallest building in Boston—62 stories, 790 feet
  • depending on where you are we will see surrounding buildings reflected in the windows
  • the old reflecting in the new!
  • Glass fell out. Hancock tried to sue the glass company, but they were the underwriters, so they couldn’t

Before 12

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #12
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Copley Square
    Newbury Street
    Trinity Church
    The Boston Public Library
    Fairmont Copley Plaza
    Westin Hotels

At 12

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Call welcome center

Leave 12

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • Next is Stop # 13 the Theater Disctrict, Boston Common, China town

BeTween 12 & 13

Boylston ST

  • Doctor Zabdiel Boylston.
  • first in Boston to inoculate patients for Small Pox starting with his own six-year-old son in 1721.
  • In an epidemic of small pox in the winter of 1721-1722 the town of Boston lost one in six people to the dreaded disease.
  • Dr. Boylston had only 6 die of the 286 people that he treated.
  • The Reverend Cotton Mather was one of the early supporters and recipient of the inoculation.

Fish weirs

  • In 1913
  • first of the ancient fish weirs were discovered under Boston.
  • These were woven sticks stuck into the shoreline. When the tide was high fish would swim in as the tide receded the fish got trapped in the basket like structures and then the early native people could easily retrieve the fish.
  • Through carbon dating date back 4900 to 3700 years ago and were used, repaired, and moved for over a span of 1200 years.

BIT/MIT

  • On the left where the large white granite is located is where MIT was first located.
  • Founded in 1860 as Boston Institute of Technology,
  • first students in 1865 due to the Civil War going on.
  • Moved to Cambridge in 1916, changed name to Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Museum of Natural History

  • The Gallery at the Historic Museum of Natural History
  • Restoration Hardware
  • Bringing structure up to date and adapting it to RH’s new retail vision took 15 months of renovation work. “The exterior was a historic restoration in the truest sense of the term,” says principal James Gillam. “Inside was more or less a complete gut and, as much as possible, an approximation of the original interior.”
  • Consulting old photographs and architectural drawings, the designers took out mezzanines inserted by previous tenants, removed an elevator bank that blocked the central axis through the building, and refurbished original details. Most significant, they opened up the atrium to recapture views from the ground floor all the way to the gilded, coffered ceiling. Gliding up and down that 70-foot-high space is the store’s pièce de résistance: a glass elevator modeled after the one in Los Angeles’s 1893 Bradbury Building, another of Friedman’s favorite landmarks.
  • While providing dramatic settings, the museum-scaled rooms presented challenges for showcasing RH’s domestic furnishings. The company spent almost a year designing artful vignettes, which, Friedman says, “force you to stop and consider home design in a different way.”

Boston Legal Bldg

  • 500 Boylston Street—The fictional law firm Crane, Poole & Schmidt’s Boston office
  • Boston Legal;
    James Spader
    William Shatner
    Candie Bergen

the Berkely—Lego Bldg

  • constructed in 1905,
  • Beaux Arts Style
  • 424 Boylston Street

Arlington chUrch

  • Opened 1861.
  • It was the first public building built in the Back Bay.
  • supported by 999 wooden pilings.
  • 16 stained glass Tiffany windows
  • installed between 1898 and 1929. Louis Comfort Tiffany personally supervised the design and creation.
  • The bells that are still rung by hand here.

BPD Building

  • The Loews Boston Hotel is the former headquarters of the Boston Police Department— 1926 to 1997
  • 1st publicly funded, organized police force with officers on duty full-time was created in Boston in 1838
  • Operators answered emergency calls “Devonshire-8 1212” until 1972 when 9-1-1 became the emergency number.
  • In the movie The Brink’s Job
  • Italian Renaissance-style

Salada tea door

  • These 12-foot-tall, 2-ton bronze doors to celebrate his industry’s storied past.
  • In 1927
  • Salada Tea Headquarters
  • Ten panels telling the story of the exotic origins of tea.
  • They depict scenes including
    Ceylonese famers harvesting,
    sorting and drying tea leaves,
    workers transporting tea boxes on their heads,
    elephants carrying tea boxes,
    and tea being loaded onto ships.
  • The outer doorframe, includes pilasters of
    stylized Asian women,
    a frieze featuring elephants,
    and high-relief statues of Demeter, goddess of the harvest, with her children.
  • The building has been sold many times over the years, but the doors still stand.

south end

  • The largest intact Victorian row house district in the country
  • Over 300 acres.
  • Originally marshlands in Boston’s South Bay.
  • Grew from filling in land north and west of “the Neck”
  • The original shore line of Boston Neck crosses in front of 40 St. George Street, and tapers to the narrowest point on the Neck at Dover Street. Blackstone and Franklin Square are solid land on the original neck, but clam and snail shells are just beneath its surface, as high seas would occasionally overrun the Neck.
  • They planned a large residential neighborhood to relieve the crowded downtown and Beacon Hill neighborhoods.
  • The city also hoped for a large and stable tax base.
  • Charles Bulfinch laid out some of the first filled land.
  • After being filled in, construction began in 1849.
  • Nineteenth-century technology did not allow for driving steel piles into bedrock, and instead a system of submerged timbers provided an understructure for most South End buildings
  • Washington Street, the original causeway that connected Roxbury to Boston, is the primary business thoroughfares
  • Filled land in the South End was originally eight feet above sea level, but is now four feet, as fill settles.
  • A burgeoning middle class moved to the South End including business owners, two mayors, bankers, and industrialists. Though the neighborhood’s status as a wealthy neighborhood was relatively short-lived, myths of a dramatic white flight in the 1880s are not entirely true. A series of national financial panics (see e.g., Panic of 1884, Economic history of the United States), combined with the emergence of new residential housing in Back Bay and Roxbury fed a steady decline of whites of English Protestant ancestry. Whites remained in the neighborhood, but increasingly they were Irish Catholic and recent immigrants.
  • By the close of the nineteenth century the South End was becoming a tenement district, first attracting new immigrants and, in the 1940s, single gay men.
  • The South End also became a center of black middle class Boston life and culture. The largest concentration of Pullman Porters in the country lived in the South End, mostly between Columbus Avenue and the railroad bed.
  • As the decades progressed, more buildings became tenements and by the 1960s absentee landlordism was rampant and the neighborhood was one of the poorest of the city.

old hancock bldg

  • From 1947 until 1964 it was the second-tallest building
  • The beacon was first lit on March 15, 1950
  • Steady blue, clear view.
    Flashing blue, clouds due.
    Steady red, rain ahead.
    Flashing red, snow instead.[3]
  • During baseball season, flashing red means the Boston Red Sox game has been called off on account of weather.

Park plaza hotel

  • Opened in May of 1927
  • the rooms included radio reception at no extra charge, with the choice of two stations!
  • The Hotel Statler and the Statler Office building.
  • Over the years many foreign dignitaries and U.S. Presidents, including F.D.R., Harry S Truman, Ronald Reagan and Bill Clinton have visited the hotel.
  • The unusual shape of the building is a triangle.

Armory

  • 1891-1897
  • First Corps of Cadets
  • The first Corps of Cadets was established in 1741 to protect the governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • The First Corps of Cadets was incorporated into the National Guard in the 1940’s
  • The building still has a dry moat, working drawbridge and bulletproof shutters in the windows of the turrets.

Coconut Grove

  • Tragic fire 1942.
  • Over 1,000 people crowded inside nearly double the number it was zoned for.
  • The main door was a revolving door, quickly jammed.
  • doors had been chained shut to prevent people from sneaking in,
  • Other doors only opened into the building.
  • 492 people were killed.
  • changed fire codes in the entire country:
    where you find revolving doors there must be doors that push open to the street beside the revolving door and all doors on buildings must open towards the outside

ChinaTown

  • Chinese and Vietnamese restaurants located in Chinatown
  • Boston’s Chinatown is one of the largest Chinatowns outside of New York City
  • many community programs and events held in Chinatown annually

Theater district

  • The Puritans banned theatre here in Boston and stage shows were not officially allowed until 1792.
  • The first theater in Boston was the Boston Theater built in 1794.
  • Watch and Ward Society tried to have shows censored and and in 1904 Mayors could censor—‘Banned in Boston’
  • Charles Playhouse
    The Colonial (the oldest surviving theatre in the city)
    the Wilbur,
    Emerson Majestic; 1st theater with decorative lighting
    to be installed during the construction
    the Shubert; 1910. many Broadway bound plays
    got their start
    Wang Center
    Opera House.

The Wang

  • opened in 1925 as the Metropolitan Theatre, a grand vaudeville and theater palace.
  • Over the years, the theatre fell into disrepair until 1983 when the late Dr. An Wang, founder of Wang (Computer) Company, donated a generous sum of money. In gratitude, the theatre was renamed the Wang Center for the Performing Arts.

Comedy

  • Boston Stand-up comedy scene in the 80s and early 90s;
    The Comedy Connection
    Nick’sComedy club
  • Kevin Meaney,
    Denis Leary,
    Steven Wright,
    Bobcat Goldthwait,
    Paula Poundstone,
    Jimmy Tingle,
    Steve Sweeney
    Lenny Clarke

Before 13

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #13
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Trolley Stop Store Ticket Center
    Boston Common
    Public Garden
    Chinatown
    Theatre District
    Park Plaza Hotel
    The Four Seasons Hotel
    Revere Hotel.

At 13

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails
  • Just a reminder your ticket is your reboarding pass throughout the day. At the end of your tour, you will be left with a portion of your ticket that serves as a comment card and one of the components of our quality control. This card is postage paid and goes directly to the CEO of the company down in Key West, Florida. He enjoys receiving these cards and hearing how you liked the tour, so if you have a few minutes before you leave Boston, or when you return home, fill it out and drop it in the mail. Also, keep in mind as you travel around the country, you can take the same quality tour in San Diego, California, Key West, Florida, Washington D.C., St. Augustine, Fla., Savannah, Georgia and our newest city in Nashville Tenn. If you purchased your ticket on line then you will receive an emailed comment card,

safety Hitchcock

Welcome center Seat count

Leave 13

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • The next stop will be Stop #14 Beacon Hill, State House Boston Common Visitor Center

beTween 13 & 14

Edgar allen poe

  • born on Carver St.
  • His first book, a collection of poems, did not sell.
  • So, he enlisted in the Army to support himself
  • Stationed out at Fort Independence here on Castle Island in Boston for five months.
  • While there, he heard a legend of an officer being walled up (later inspire his story The Cask of Amontillado).
  • Life size and includes the raven, heart and pages from his manuscripts flowing down the sidewalk behind him

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—

Love The Raven. Read it to my kids on Halloween.

public garden

  • 1st botanical garden in the US, 1837
  • 1,000 trees and about 50 different species from all over the world.
  • The Lagoon (Swan Pond) where the Swan Boats are pedaled from April to September since 1877
  • The oldest is 110 years old.
  • The bridge that crosses the Swan Pond out to the left side of the trolley was constructed in 1869.
  • The plants used in the Public Garden are primarily grown in the Boston Parks and Recreation Department’s greenhouses. They cultivate over 80 species of plants

Water to left

  • This street and all the area to our left was once water.
  • Charles St was laid out by the end of the 1700’s and there were Ropewalks where the Public Garden is located today.

Boston Common-soldiers camp

  • To our right, the British soldiers when camped out
  • on April 18, 1775, they boarded their longboats to cross the Charles River to Cambridge and then start the march out to Lexington and Concord.
  • The next day on the 19th of April, “the shot heard round the world” took place beginning the American Revolution .

duckling statue

  • Robert McCloskey, author of Make Way for Ducklings
  • her ducklings Jack, Kack, Lack, Mack, Nack, Oack, Pack and Quack!

Boston common

  • oldest public park in the United States.
  • Of the original 50 acres purchased by the Puritans from William Blackstone in 1634, 48 acres remain as a park to this date.
  • Blackstone, an Anglican minister and somewhat of a recluse, was the only European settler on the Shawmut Peninsula when the Puritans came to Charlestown in 1630.
  • After they discovered the water in Charlestown was brackish (salty) and the area was not really habitable (lots of mosquitoes), they took Reverend Blackstone (Blaxton\Blackstone) up on his offer of moving across to the Shawmut Peninsula and settled in the North End area of Boston.
  • The Puritans taxed themselves 6 shillings from each household for a total of 30 pounds to pay for this land, to be used as a common area for cattle grazing and a training-ground for the militia.

beacon St

Purple windows

  • known as Lavenders
  • they were actually a mistake.
  • When the glass for the windows was imported from mported from Bavaria is 1820, it was clear.
  • Exposure to sunlight resulted in a purple tint.
  • Found that The manufacturer of the glass put too much manganese oxide in the formula.
  • While owners were unhappy at the time, the purple panes have become a status symbol
  • Others have tried to install purple panes, but the color is uniques an imposible to duplicate—gradient
  • The original panes can be found in only six houses here in Beacon Hill.

Rev Blackstone

  • Rev Blackstone, Spruce and Beacon was location of his house—Plaque at the 300 anniversary
  • 1625-1635—a recluse on Shawmut peninsular
  • Massachusetts and Wampanogs herre but not on Shawmut
  • Came to Wessagusett first—tht colony failed and went to Plymouth
  • 1635 went to Rhode Island to preach
  • Pop; 1625—1
  • Invited Winthrop over

Address numbers

  • 39 Beacon St. Henry Wadsworth Longfellow married his longtime fiancée Miss Fannie Appleton. After the wedding the two headed to their Cambridge home, (a wedding gift from Fannie’s father) which today is operated by the National Park Service.
  • 34 Beacon—Little brown
  • 25 Beacon—Beacon Pub
  • Numbers on the houses as we go up the street, they run consecutively rather than the usual odd even. That is because the Common is on the right side of the street. There will never be houses or buildings built on that side of the street.

frog pond

  • because at one time there were lots of frogs here.
  • In the wintertime there is an outdoor ice-skating rink here. In the summer it serves as a wading pool for the kids of Boston.
  • Dunk peopel as a punishment

How deep is the Frog Pond? Knee Deep, Knee Deep

Freedom Trail

  • A free walking tour, 2.5 miles (one way)
  • 16 historical sites involved in the revolution
  • Begins at the Boston Common Visitor’s Center and ends at the Bunker Hill Monument
  • Red line on the sidewalks and streets (sometimes painted, mostly set in red brick)
  • Bronze signs mark the sites.

state house

  • designed in 1797 by Charles Bulfinch.
  • Bulfinch also designed the State Capitals in Maine and Connecticut and the Capital Building in Washington D.C.)
  • 15 white horses, one for each state, pulled the cornerstone up the hill where Governor Samuel Adams and Paul Revere presided over its laying.
  • The total cost of construction was $133,333.33. This by the way was way over budget

Gold dome

  • originally wooden whitewashed shingles.
  • The shingles tended to leak, so in 1802 the dome was covered with copper from Paul Revere’s copper rolling mill
  • gilded in 1861.

State house statues

  • Henry Cabot Lodge (38-year member of U.S. Congress)
  • John F. Kennedy (35th President and native Bostonian, really Brookline though)
  • Horace Mann (a lawyer and President of the Mass. Senate, also considered to be the Father of Public Education)
  • Daniel Webster (Senator/orator, this was the second statue sent to Boston, the first was lost at sea coming from Italy)
  • Anne Hutchinson (who believed that women could preach the gospel-- was exiled from Boston by the Puritan leaders)
  • General Joseph Hooker (Commander of the Army of the Potomac during the Civil War, the statue was designed by Daniel Chester French and the Horse by Edward Potter)
  • Mary Dyer (Quaker Religious Fighter). The Puritans banned her from Boston 3 times. 4th time, she was hanged on Boston Common in 1660.

Before 14

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #14
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Ring the Bell

Oscar this stop

  • Massachusetts State House
    The 54th Regiment Memorial
    Black Heritage Trail
    start of Freedom Trail
    Downtown Crossing,
    Athenaeum
    burial grounds

At 14

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Nixon safety

Leave 14

Next Stop

Ring bell for safety

  • Next is Stop # 15 the Boston Tea Party Ship and Museum

BeTween 14 & 15

Congregational House

Atheneum

  • 2nd oldest and largest subscription library in North America—700,000 volumes.
  • incorporated in 1807.
  • the private books of George Washington and Henry Knox,
  • A book bound in human skin, but you can learn more about that on the Ghosts and Graveyards tour. (Give info about the G & G tour when in season.)
  • Original location of the Museum of Fine Arts. Some great art and sculpures stil inside
  • Day subscriptions

XV Beacon

  • Moo Restaurant
  • Home of Bromfiled Mansion-1722
  • Wine cellar has orignal granite foundation

Back Of Adams courthouse

  • Somerset St—
  • Boston Legal;
    James Spader
    William Shatner
    Candie Bergen

King’s Chapel

  • The first Anglican Church or Church of England, in Boston.
  • Seize this land from the Puritans in 1686 since they refused to sell it to the Governor for the purpose of
  • Erecting a church that they considered to be the very reason they fled England.
  • Very unpopular with Bostonians, but served the British military coming into the town.
  • The current structure was finished 1754
  • The stone chapel was built around the original wooden structure. The wooden structure was dismantled and thrown out the windows of the stone building.
  • The wood was then sent to Lunenburg Nova Scotia for the construction of St. John’s.
  • The original box pews and the wineglass pulpit, is the oldest pulpit in continuous use at the same site in America.
  • 1789 became the first Unitarian Church in the country.

Omni Parker

  • opened in 1855.
  • oldest continuous operating hotel in America
  • Parker House Rolls,
    Boston Cream Pie (first made here in 1856)
    Boston Scrod. (“white fish catch of the day” either Haddock or Cod whichever was fresher.)
  • Favorite spot of many clubs including literary clubs with members such as Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Henry David Thoreau and Ralph Waldo Emerson.
  • The idea for the Atlantic Monthly magazine came out of the Saturday Club the literary club that met at the Parker House.
  • Oliver Wendell Homes wrote a poem entitled “The Saturday Club” about the club and the Parker House.
  • In 1867, Charles Dickens was a resident guest here at the Parker House and read his story A Christmas Carol next door at the Tremont Temple.
    -Ghost stories were a part of Christmas and Dickens revived Christmas here in America/Boston
  • Malcolm X worked as a busboy in the dining room;
    Ho Chi Minh worked in the kitchen.
  • the Omni Parker House is also said to be the most haunted hotel in Boston. Guests have reported encounters with the original owner, Harvey Parker, and former guests including celebrities like Charles Dickens

Haunted with ghosts, specters of the owner, apparition of a woman. You can see spirits in the bar now

Ben franklin statue

  • Erected 1856
  • born on Milk Street
  • attended Boston Latin but never graduated
  • apprenticed to his brother, James.
  • did not have a good relationship and Benjamin left his apprenticeship to Philadelphia where he opened his own printing company and published his own paper.

Old city hall

  • completed in 1865.
  • The elaborate French second Empire style
  • the donkey statue represents the dominant political party in Boston, the Democratic Party.
  • statue of Josiah Quincy, 1st mayor of the City of Boston from 1823-1829.

BLS

  • Founded by the Puritans on April 23, 1635, 1st public school in the new world.
  • School Street because Boston Latin School.
  • Ben Franklin
    Cotton Mather,
    Samuel Adams,
    Charles Bulfinch,
    Ralph Waldo Emerson,
    Arthur Fiedler,
    Leonard Bernstein
    Henry Knox
    John Hancock
    4 Presidents
    8 Mass Gov
    5 Signers of the Declaration of Independance
  • The school today is located in the Fens area of Boston.

My kids go there

My kids became teenagers overnight. 1 day my 12 year old was giving me a hard time. I said ‘these are the rules and I told her that she was old enough to run away’

Charle Ponzi Office

  • in 1920, he convinced people he could double their money in 180 days. And he could, for a while.
  • He paid early investors with money from later investors. About 20,000 investors gave him $10 million.
  • In less than a year, the swindle unraveled, and he went to prison
  • the financial world had a new phrase: Ponzi scheme.

Irish famine Memorial

  • June 28, 1998 to for the 150th anniversary
  • One is a poor hungry family in Ireland and the other is family arriving in Boston full of hope and determination.

Corner book store

  • on the site of Anne Hutchinson’s house,
  • after that home burnt down in 1711, this building was built around 1718.
  • It has served many different functions over the years including most famously as the publishing house of Ticknor and Fields, who published the works of Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes, Hawthorne and Thoreau.
  • Cinningham House nxext door—1728

Old south meeting house

  • built in 1729
  • second oldest in city,
  • the largest meeting place in Colonial Boston
  • many important events took place here including the Tea Party meeting.
  • British soldiers occupied the church. Used it as stable and a bar.
  • Oldest working clock—1768

Bldg next to Corner book store

Pi Alley

Newspaper row

Pernassus Corner

  • 1840s—1860s
  • Publishing houses of Ticknor and Fields, who published the works of Alcott, Longfellow, Lowell, Holmes, Hawthorne and Thoreau.
  • Transcendentalists
  • Atlantic Monthly

Washington Street

  • oldest part of Boston
  • The largest, longest, widest road was the one that led off the peninsula today this is named Washington St. it is right behind us.

street names

  • By the 1700’s, Boston was recording and naming streets. Street names like Water, Milk, Beacon and about 100 others down in this area still exist today. Names were often practical, Water St. for the fresh water spring. (The Spring still exists underground) Beacon Street led to the warning beacon for the town.

PO Square

Post Office

  • 1st Post Office in America in 1639.
  • between Washington and Devonshire Streets.
  • After the fire of 1872 a large post office was built here in the square. No longer a post office here but the name remains.

Angell Fountain

  • To the left is the Angell Memorial Park. The large monument and fountain is dedicated to George Thorndike Angell, a founder of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The fountain was designed to be a watering spot for horses in 1912. In 1982 the “creature pond” was added, this bronze “pond” has an assortment of animals and was intentionally designed to be as “lovable as possible” to prevent vandalism.

Federal Reserve Building(S)

  • 1913, 12 Federal Reserve Banks (our nation’s central bank) open for business.
  • The Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, October 1914.
  • 1922 built on Franklin St
  • Now The Langham.
  • In 1977, moved to 600 Atlantic Avenue in Dewey Square.

Great Fire of 1872

  • November 9, 1872,
  • the corner of Summer St. and Kingston Streets was a granite four-story building a few years old.
  • Wholesale dealers of hosiery, gloves, laces and other dry goods. The top floor was a manufacturing shop for hoop skirts.
  • Sparks flew to the roofs nearby and ignited the tar coverings, the narrow streets allowed the fire to jump from building to building.
  • Within hours Boston’s mercantile district was an inferno.
  • about 776 buildings had been destroyed and 60 acres of land leveled. 1000 businesses.
  • Within a few years this area which would be rebuilt and flourishing again as a manufacturing and mercantile district.
  • Fire codes changed—wider streets, fire escapes, fire exists, fire codes in buildings, central fire station, better hydrants
  • Chicago—1871
  • Today, Boston’s Financial District

Tea PArty

Set up

  • In Old South Metting House, there was a meeting in 1773, that lead to the Boston Tea party. It was the spark that ignited the American Revolution.

background

  • Starting in the 1760s, the King and parlement had been taxing the colonies to get out of the debt caused by the French and Indian war.
  • Bostonians saw themselves as proud British citizens who are being treated unfairly by their beloved king. They didn’t want to pay the tax because “taxation without representation was tyranny”. It was against British Law.
  • The 1773 Tea Act taxed the tea and gave the British-East India Company monoply on selling tea in the colonies, which allowed them to dump cheap tea on the colonies,
  • This would have actually lowered the price of tea.
  • Also, to allow taxes set a precedent that Britain could tax whatever they wanted.

The meeting

  • On Dec 16, 1773, colonists met to discuss the situation. There were 3 ships filled with tea in Boston harbor and the colonists were expected to unload it, pay the tax, and buy this cheap tea.
  • The colonists wanted the ships to leave Boston without unloading the tea so the tax would not have to be paid.
  • During the meeting , a message was sent to The Royal Governor William Hutchinson, asking that the ships be sent back to England with the tea.
  • New York and Philadelphia and Charelston governor did.
  • He said NO—the tea was to be unloaded the next morning.
  • Samuel Adams, upon hearing this, stood and said;

Tea Party

  • This was a prearranged signal for the Sons of Liberty/rebels.

tea party

  • 90 Sons of Liberty left the meeting...
  • Dressed as Mohawk warriors, they went down Milk street and right on Pearl to Griffin’s Wharf...
  • Boarded the 3 ships, forced the crew off, and went into storge causing no damage but a broken padlock, (replaced the next day)
  • Most from the people from the meeting were there to see.
  • The men threw 342 crates of tea into Boston Harbor.
  • Took 4 hours in the dark—no moon. Very somber and quite—just did their work and left
  • Today that would be about $2.5M

Reaction

  • The colonists hoped this would cause the British Government to repell the Tea Tax.
  • There are some events that have a huge impact on the course of human history;
    Fall of Rome
    1st printing press
    the Internet
    The Beatles White Album.
  • Boston Tea Party is one of those events because of happened next.
  • The King and the British government declared the colonies in a state of rebellion.
  • Parliament passed a series of laws called the Coercive Acts to punish Boston, reestablish control, and send a message to the other colonies that THEY were in charge.
  • One law shut down Boston harbor and turned it to a military governer until they paid for the destroyed tea. This act caused the closing of Boston Harbor by the British.
  • In Massachusetts they called them the Intolerable Acts.
  • The First Continental Congress was organized to coordinate the resistance of the Intolerable Acts.
  • Delegates from the colonies met in Philadelphia. They boycotted English goods, encourage domestic manufacturing, stopped paying taxes, and prepared for war.
  • The First Cont. Congress was the first, coordinated colony-wide action in British America. They were separate and rivals before this, but now the colonies were a united, acting as like a nation would act against the British King.
  • The first C.C. is what Historians, anthropologists and social scientists would call ‘a wicked big deal’.
  • And it all happened right here under our feet.

Tea PArty museum

  • A reinactment of the Sam Adams meeting on Dec 16, 1773
  • 2 replica ships, the Brig Beaver and the Eleanor, with the DArtmouth to be added.
  • The museum itself contains state of the art, high-tech exhibits and films that bring this important event to life!
  • The Robinson Tea Chest. This tea chest is the only two known existing chest that actually survived the Tea Party.
  • Abigail’s Tea Room upstairs, which has delicious food, pastries and a variety of teas to choose from.

Before 15

back to top

Approach Safety

  • Pulling into stop #15
    Remain seated till the trolley has stopped and the door is open.

Oscar this stop

  • Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum
    Children’s Museum
    South Station
    Seaport

At 15

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step, use the handrails, take any trash, we have hand sanitizing wipes, you need to back here to reboard, A trolley will be by every # minutes.

On Safety

  • Watch your step, use the handrails

Rules

  • Welcome aboard Old Town Trolley
    my name is Murph.
  • Remain seated, no smoking, no alcohol consumption on keep everything completely inside, turn off all cell phones, This is a narrated tour, no talking, Watch low hanging branches, use handrails

Change at 1

  • If you are continuing on the tour you will transferring to the front trolley and getting a new Tour Conductor for the, a “changing of the Guide” if you will. Enjoy the rest of tour and your stay in our fine city of Boston and tell your friends to ride Old Town Trolley in any and all of our cities. Thank you for riding with Old Town Trolley/Boston. Don’t forget get about our evening Ghost and Gravestones Tour. Have a great day, Bye.

Leave 15

Next Stop

  • the Aquarium,
    Long wharf,
    Boston Harbor Cruise Company,
    Quincy Market.

BeTween 15 & 1

Fort Point Channel

  • separaties South Boston from downtown Boston, feeding into Boston Harbor

Children’s museum

  • Participatory exhibits for children of all ages.

See Boston children in their natural hbitat

Boston fire museum

  • owned and operated by the Boston Sparks Association; they are retired firefighters and fire buffs (known as Sparks).
  • Saturdays from 11 to 6 pm—free—except donations.
  • The third oldest in the city, built in 1890.
  • One was always required to stay in the house in case of a fire in the wool warehouses that abounded in this area.

Fort Point Historic District

  • Fort Point was at one point the wool capital of the United States.
  • The original Fort Point was once the Dorchester Flats.
  • Boston shipping industry important in the development of the city in the early 1800’s.
  • The Boston Wharf Co filled the flats From 1836 to 1882
  • They parceled out all of the lots and laid out all of the streets from scratch.
  • Current buildings constructed between the 1880s and 1920s.
  • The buildings built by the company feature a copper medallion that reads “BW Co.” and the year in which the building was built.
  • Built for the manufacture and storage of a wide variety of goods, beginning with sugar and molasses and branching out into the wool trade by the end of the 19th century.
  • This district made Boston the main production and marketing center for wool for clothing and fabrics during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
  • Rail lines ran down the side streets off Congress Street. These rail lines serviced the warehouses that lined the street of Fort Point.
  • Between 1950 and today, the wool industry disappeared from Fort Point, the district’s buildings were abandoned.
  • In the 1970s, artists gradually moved into the large, well-lit warehouse loft spaces, thus creating New England’s largest enclave of artists, the Fort Point Arts Community.
  • Recently, Fort Point was redeveloped, the district was not leveled. Instead, the old buildings were used for a new district.
  • Residential, business, institutional, and mixed lands uses.
  • Fort Point is Boston's largest and most significant collection of historic industrial buildings. The historic warehouses and industrial buildings feel cohesive because they were designed by the same architects, within a relatively short period. These buildings have been converted into loft conversions with high ceilings, exposed brick, and wooden beams.
  • Fort Point is an architecturally-consistent, former industrial neighborhood, with a strong artistic and cultural history, transforming into luxury enclaves.

BCEC

  • 2004
  • Largest in the Northeast.
  • large enough to allow 18-wheelers to pull in and unload.
  • could hold 16 football fields.

Seaport district

  • The Seaport is the up-and-coming neighborhood
  • This was once primarily an industrial and shipping area with boat, train and trucks everywhere.
  • This was the port of shipping items all over New England and beyond.
  • The building of the Convention Center 2004 brought 3 major hotels
  • shops, restaurants, bars, office, hotel, recreational areas and living space.
  • restaurants=Yankee lobster, Legals, 75 Liberty wharf, Morton’s, Davios.
  • There are four museums;
    the ICA,
    the Boston Children’s Museum,
    Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum and
    the Boston Fire Museum.
  • The Cruise Port Terminal,
  • Conference centers;
    the BCEC the largest conference space in New England,
    the Seaport world trade center
    Exchange Conference Center Fish Pier
  • Bank Pavilion to luncheon and dinner cruises.
  • There are water taxis, subway and buses to get you to and from the area.
  • The Fish Pier, over 100 years old. Many refineries and commercial fisheries.

Port & Fishing District

  • Fishing Industry was important to the development of Massachusetts as a colony and a young Commonwealth.
  • By the mid 1800’s, The the whaling industry was big
  • Over 10,000 men were sailing the seas in search of the Right and Sperm whales.
  • The cod trade was always important—starting in the 1600s—and made a lot of money for many Bostonians.

stateWorld trade center

  • On the Commonwealth Pier built in the later 1800’s.

Seaport common

  • A green space dedicated as gathering spot and place for public art that is constantly changing.
  • Boston Harbor and waterfront on other side.

Seaport Blvd

  • Great Restaurants and shops
  • Colorful sculpures are called ‘Land, Sea, Air’ by Okuda San Miguel

ICA

  • Across the street from the common on the waterfront ICA.
  • 2006 this building opened.

Moakley coarthouse

  • Completed in 1998.
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Massachusetts District.
  • There are public galleries throughout the building with ever changing exhibits by local and world artists.
  • Famous trials:

shrine of Lady o’good voyage

  • It replaced the Chapel of the same name that has been located here in this area for decades so that they could redevelop the land.
  • Dedicated on April 22, 2017

Martin’s Park

  • Honors the youngest victim of the Boston Marathon bombings, 2013, Martin Richard.

moakley bridge

  • Evelyn Moakley was the wife of former Representative Joe Moakley.

Tea Party Museum

  • To the left is another view of the Boston Tea Party Ships and Museum as we cross over the Evelyn Moakley Bridge.

griffin wharf

  • Where the Boston Tea Party actually happened. There is a plaque on the side of the building to indicate this.

Financial District

  • 2nd largest industry in boston
  • Top 5 in the country
    Top 15 in the world
    Global Financial Centres Index (GFCI)
  • the Greater Boston metropolitan area has the 6th-largest economy in the country and 12th-largest in the world.
  • HQ of Fidelity Investments,
    Putnam Investments, and
    DWS Scudder Investments
    John Hancock Insurance
    Liberty Mutual Insurance
    The Boston Company Asset Management
    Bain & Company
  • World HQ for State Street Bank
    Eastern Bank.

Central Artery

  • The Central Artery was a section of espressway; Interstate 93, US 1 and Route 3.
  • The original Artery, constructed in the 1950s
  • When it opened, it was already too small for the volume of traffic
  • The highway gradually became more and more congested as other highway projects meant to complement the Artery were canceled.
  • Congestion inspired “The Distressway,”
  • From the mid-1990s through the early 2000s as part of the Central Artery/Tunnel Project (the “Big Dig”).
  • Today, the artery is through the O’Neill Tunnel
  • The original Artery was demolished and replaced with the Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy Greenway

Customs house

  • the original building completed in 1847.
  • Boston’s first skyscraper when the tower was added in 1913.
  • Now a Marriott Hotel and consists of time-share condos.

Greenway

  • This park was created after the Big Dig—Central Artery Highway was put underground and the elevated highway was torn down.
  • stretches about 1.5 miles from the Chinatown Section to the North End.

NE Aquarium

  • Completed in 1969
  • Home to about 12,000 specimens of fish, invertebrates, mammals, birds, reptiles and amphibians from around the world,
  • the Giant Ocean Tank; one of the largest cylindrical saltwater tanks in the world, at 40 feet wide and about 23 feet deep and it’s filled with 200,000 gallons of seawater.
  • There are two touch tanks the Shark and Ray tank and the Edge of the Sea tank.
  • The Harbor seals live in an open-air habitat on display here year-round to the left on the main doors to the Aquarium.
  • The Aquarium also has an IMAX Theater.

Boston Harbor & cruises

  • It is the oldest continuously active major port in the Western Hemisphere.
  • In 1702, while still part of England, Boston was the busiest port in America and had the 3rd largest shipping tonnage among English seaports (London and Bristol preceded it).
  • Throughout much of the 19th century, Boston was the third busiest seaport in the United States (New York was first and Philadelphia was second)
  • tours of the harbor and outer islands, whale watches, dinner, dance, twilight and sightseeing cruises; each one offers a unique view of Boston’s skyline.

Before 1

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  • Oscar Fanueil Hall...
    Quincy Market...
    New England Aquarium...
    Waterfront...
    North End...

CD#22

Change trolleys

  • Transfer here if you want to continue the tour
  • which means, our time is at an end
  • But I won’t leave you empty handed
    —upgrades
    —discounts
    —Ghost & Graveyards—$5 to parks and rec
    —Improve Asylum
    —Boston harbor cruise
    —OTT in USA

‘Bye

  • And thanks.
  • I hope you had as much fun as I did.
  • If you did, please give me feedback. Please, give me an online review on Trip Advisor.
    My name is Murph.
  • If the creek don’t rise and the good Lord’s willing,
    and I don’t become the ambassador to Ireland,
    I’ll be here giving tours all summer.
    Tell your friends how great Boston is & send them our way.
  • I am available to answer any questions you have.
  • Thank you again. Sine.

Bell

At 1

Off Safety

  • Please watch your step
    Use the handrails.
    Take any trash
    We have hand sanitizing wipes
    Next trolley in front.

SINE

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Shawmut

  • For most of the city’s history Boston was a much smaller place.
  • The original landmass of present-day Boston was first known as Shawmut, which is an Indian word for “living waters”.
  • The original size of the Shawmut Peninsula was 783 acres or about 1.2 sq. miles.
  • Today Boston is 48.2 sq. miles due to landfill and the annexation of many surrounding towns in the 1800’s and early 1900’s.
  • The only land route in and out of Boston was Boston neck, which was a little strip of land connecting Boston to the mainland of Massachusetts. This in inclement weather could be covered over with water. During colonial times, Boston at extremely high tides and big storms would become an island.
  • founded in 1630
  • incorporated as a city in 1822.

Winthrop Fleet

  • The first settlers in Boston came from England in 1630.
  • The Arbella lead a fleet of eleven ships carrying over a thousand Puritans to Massachusetts that year. It was the largest original venture ever attempted in the English New World.
  • The passengers left England in 1630 with their new charter and a great vision.
  • John Winthrop was there leader and stated their purpose quite clearly:. They were to be an example for the rest of the world in rightful living. “We shall be as a city upon a hill, the eyes of all people are upon us.”
  • They were different from the other colonies. Massachusetts was founded based on society and Protestantism.
  • The other colonies were either business ventures focusing on extraction. Or they were a place for ngland to dump thier unwanted, outcasts and fanatics.

Salutory Neglect

  • Early 1600s colonists were outcasts and un-productive members of English society
  • Colonies (1600s) created their own leadership structures—elected legislator, trustees, house of bourgesses—out of necessity and survival.
  • These assemblies had no basis in English law or sanctioned by the king
  • But, King and parlienment did really care at first
  • Every once in a while, tried to creeate a system to gain control, but quickly faded.
  • Then decided to let the colonies work on their own and they will continue to prosper
  • Mercantilism (navigation acts) encouraged smuggling and ship building in New England
  • As the colonies became more prosperous and important, parliement didn’t have the means to control them from 3000 miles away and didn;t want to pay for it.
  • Incompetence, lazy, good judgement.
  • Unitl 1765.
  • Colonies want to be fully recognized Englishmen, culturally and legally as part of the empire, not just a plantation to feed the mother land.
  • They had a grienvance against the king that they were not being treateed as full Englishmen.

Boston buildings

  • Blake House, Dorchester, 1661
  • Paul Revere House, North End, 1680
  • Pierc House, Dorchester, 1683
  • Pierce-Hichborn House, North end, 1711
  • Old State House, Boston, 1713
  • Union Oyster, 1716
  • Old Corner Book store, 1718
  • Old North Church, 1723
  • Cunningham House, 1728
  • Old South meeting house, 1729
  • Fanueil Hall, 1742
  • King’s Chapel, 1750
  • Gardiner Bldg (Chart House) 1763F

Why Revolution

  • From the 1630s to the 1760s—over 100 years—the colonies were used to taking care of their own affairs—set taxes, pass laws, their own court systems, raise their own militia, create treaties with others. They were ignored by the rulers in England—salutory neglect.
  • In 1763, The French and Indian War ended putting England in debt. The king and Parliement reasoned, ‘the colonies benefited from the war, they should help pay for it through taxation.’
  • James Otis “We’re not just some planation to be ruled from afar at will. We are part of the British empire subject only to the laws and taxes passed by our elected legistature—in the colonies.”
  • The colonists thought of themselves as English and they wanted to be concidered full members of the British empire with every right and priveledge. They were proud to be english and loved their King. The issue was how they were being treated. They resented being treated as a planation.
  • Parliement saw itself as the legislature for the whole British Empire. Parliement thought of the colonies as...a plantation to serve the mother country.
  • The problem is, there was no legal basis for any of the colonial goverments. English law didn’t acknowledge their existance. So they didn’t—in the eyes of Parliement. They were thought of as administrative bodies with no real govermental powers.
  • So, the tax wasn’t the real issue. It would have made stuff cheaper. It was the way in which the taxes were implemented—taxation without representation is tyranny.
  • Tension escalated. At first, the colonies sought reconciliation. When that didn’t work Independeance was the only option.

Revolution Timeline

Established by Royal charter in the 17th and 18th centuries, the American colonies were largely autonomous in domestic affairs and commercially prosperous, trading with Britain and its Caribbean colonies, as well as other European powers via their Caribbean entrepôts. After British victory in the Seven Years’ War in 1763, tensions arose over trade, colonial policy in the Northwest Territory and taxation measures, including the Stamp Act and Townshend Acts. Colonial opposition led to the 1770 Boston Massacre and 1773 Boston Tea Party, with Parliament responding by imposing the so-called Intolerable Acts.

  • 1763—Treaty of Paris
    1+ year
  • Mar, 1765 — Stamp Act; 1st direct tax on American colonies.
    1 year
  • 1766 — Stamp Act repealed
    1+ year
  • Jun 1767 — Townsend Acts; import tax on glass, lead, paint, paper, tea
    6 months
  • 1767—Townsend Act repealled except Tea
    1 year
  • Sep, 1768 — Troops Arrive
    1 year, 6 months
  • Mar 5, 1770—Boston Massacre
    3 year, 2 months
  • May, 1773—Tea Act; gave the British East India Company a monopoly on tea and send it right to the colonies and permission to agents to sell it
    6 months
  • Dec 1773—A group of colonists board 3 ships and dumped 340 chests of tea inot the harbor
    3 months
  • Mar 1774—Coercive Acts; to punish Mass Bay Colony and reestablish control of the other colonies.
    6 months
  • Sep 1774—1st Continental Congress; a Petition to the King and organized a boycott of British goods
    7 months
  • Apr 1775—Revere ride
  • Apr 1775—Battle of Lexington and Concord
  • Apr 1775—Battle road
  • Apr 1775—Seige of Boston
    2 months
  • Jun 1775—Battle of Bunker Hill
    2 months
  • Aug 1775—Geo Washington heads Continental Army
    6 months
  • Jan 1776—Common Sense
    2 months
  • Mar 1776—Evacuation day
    4 months
  • Jul 1776—Dec of Independance

Boston Brahmins

  • The term comes from Oliver Wendell Holmes in the mid 19th century to describe to the older, wealthy New England families of British Protestant origin.
  • They were decendants of the orignal settlers in New England.
  • They sought to uphold the Puritan ideals of Anglicanism, with traditional Anglo-American customs and clothing.
  • Boston elite are members of Boston’s traditional upper class.
  • Associated with Harvard University
  • Very wealthy as they financed or owned most of the factories in Massachusetts in the 19th century during the industrial revolution.
  • They became influential in the development of American institutions and culture up until the early 20th century.

Beacon Hill Writers

  • The mid-19th century is described as an “American Renaissance of literature”. It was when American literature came of age as an expression of a national spirit.
  • It is identified with American romanticism and Transcendentalism.
  • This was dominated by a group of New England writers. They were the “Brahmins,” notably Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and James Russell Lowell. They were aristocrats, active as professors at Harvard College, and many lived on Beacon Hill
  • One of the most important influences in the period was that of the Transcendentalists including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Bronson Alcott. They contributed to the founding of a new national culture based on native elements. They advocated reforms in church, state, and society.
  • Authors, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Henry David Thoreau, Ralph Waldo Emerson had a profound effect on American literature and society as a whole.
  • Some consider the Old Corner Bookstore to be the “cradle of American literature”, the place where these writers met and where The Atlantic Monthly was first published.
  • Boston was a leading publisher in the US. Little Brown and Beacon publishing were on Beacon St.
  • Saturday Literary Club

Boston Populations

  • 2020 census population of the City of Boston is 684,379.
  • Massachusetts population is 7,029,917
  • the 23th largest major city in the U.S.
  • Greater Boston is just over 4,309,000, the 23rd largest metropolitan city in the nation.
  • from 1960s on Boston developed the new service econmoy—health, research, finance, education, high tech, tourism—change=d from blue collar to white callar

Industry and Economy

Colonial;

  • shipping, commerce, fishing, shipbuilding (mecantilism)

Early 19th century

  • industrial textile mills, shipbuilding, shipping, commerce

mid-19th century—1920s

  • Investments in banking and railroads, industrial textile mills, woll, shipping, commerce, shoes, pianos, distillaries
  • Shipping lost importance

Great Depression—1960s

  • Textile factories moved to the South in search of cheaper labour and raw materials.
  • Radio killed the piano industry
  • Prohabition killed distillaries
  • Boston went into a decline that next for 40 years.

During World War II

  • Boston’s universities provided a source of scientific and technological talent to war-related industries
  • This helped Massachusetts with the electronics and computer industry growing along 128.
  • Boston still was in decline because of suburban exodus and malls

1950s

  • Mayor Collins and Hynes worked on The New Boston.
  • Boston initiated various urban renewal projects, under the direction of the Boston Redevelopment Authority (BRA) established in 1957.
  • In 1958, BRA initiated a project to improve the historic West End neighborhood. Extensive demolition was met with strong public opposition, and thousands of families were displaced.
  • The BRA continued implementing eminent domain projects, including the clearance of the vibrant Scollay Square area for construction of the modernist style Government Center.

1970s

  • Boston slowly changed from “mill-based” to “mind-based” industries, with major corporations dominating electronics, telecommunications, and digital research. Or from a manufacturing economy to a services economy.
  • By the 1970s, the city’s economy had begun to recover after 40 years of economic downturn.
  • A large number of high-rises were constructed in the Financial District and in Boston’s Back Bay during this period.
  • This boom continued into the mid-1980s and resumed after a few pauses.

Today

  • Boston firms took the lead in software design, computer architecture, data processing, and biomedical technologies.
  • Boston banks created high-technology investment companies connected with global financial institutions that made the city a world leader in equity fund management.
  • Boston’s universities remained an important part of the city’s economy, and their medical schools and hospitals gave the city an especially robust health care sector.
  • Hospitals such as MGH, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital lead the nation in medical innovation and patient care Dana Farber.
  • Schools such as the Boston Architectural College, BC, BU, the Harvard Medical School, Tufts University School of Medicine, Northeastern, Massachusetts College of Art and Design, Wentworth Institute of Technology, Berklee, the Boston Conservatory, and many others attract students to the area.

Healthcare

  • The number one industry is Healthcare.
  • 25 in-patient hospitals within the city.
  • The largest hospital is Massachusetts General, which is also the largest employer in the city with over 16,000 employees!
  • Longwood medical center
  • Biotech
  • 6% of all drugs produceed here
  • Genzyme, Biogen

Finance

  • Financial and insurance services are our number two industry, with companies like Fidelity, John Hancock and Prudential.

Education

  • Education is ranked as the third largest industry for the City of Boston. There are about 70 colleges and universities in the greater Boston area.
  • 8 Research Universities
  • 3 medical schools
  • Boston has the highest student population in the United States, over ¼ million students!
  • Many stay and add to the economy
  • Sept 1 is moving Day
    May 15 is Alston Christmas

High Tech

  • Technology Highway—1960s to 1980s
  • Information and electronics

Jaywalking

 

  • Good judgment comes from experience, and experience—well that comes from poor judgment!

Old words

  • Ps & Qs

Boston Words

  • U-ys
  • Tonic
  • Supper
  • Subs
  • Wicked
  • Townie
  • Packie
  • Blinker
  • Bubbler
  • Cellar
  • Supper vs dinner
  • Barrel
  • Clicker
  • Parlor
  • No Suh—no sir
  • Jimmies
  • Whadsup
  • Aunt scallops
  • Mine / stairs / store
    Monday

Boston Irish

  • Billie Farrel—from Kentucky. Commander of Constitution
  • Kennedy Greenway
  • Curely Statue
  • Kevin White
  • Mayor 84/100 years in 20th century
  • 2022 election 1st time i 144 year no Irish name on the ballot
  • Patrick Carr-Boston massacre-Irish sailor
  • 9th Irish regisment
  • Charles Logue, construction company that built Fenway park. He was from Derry Ireland
  • August St. Gaudines. Mother was irish
  • John S. Copley parents from limerick and clare

Boston Driving

  • a colossal labyrinth of seemingly unnavigable streets and causeways
  • Many ways to get from 1 place to another
  • Traffic changes as the day progresses
  • Boston is made up of parochial villages
  • Most know their way around a part of Boston, but not all. Being able to connect neighborhoods and cities is a mark of a true master
  • Change lanes because the driver sees the situatoiin has changed (or they’re tourists)
  • People care about their cars
  • Biggest cause of problems is getting in the way
    it’s fine to cut someone off, change lanes etc. Just don;t make it longer for me
  • Stay off the brakes in the snow
  • Blinkers, are a way to intimidate—I’m doing this
  • Red lights are suggestions
  • Yellow means pay more attention as you go through the intersection and make sure you have room on the other side.
  • Horns only if you can’t go around. If someone is not moving-go around
  • Stuck before your a left hand turn—you can jump into the other lane if you are 4 cars away.
  • Turning left onto a busy road with 2 way traffic; pull out to block the cars coming from the left till you are clear on the right
  • We have 2 state birds-the official is the chickadee and unofficial, you’ll see while from the other drivers in Boston
  • Let’s get mad together “Move it. Get outta here.”

Boston Music

  • Aerosmith
  • Boston
  • Aimee Mann
  • Dropkick Murphys
  • Pixies
  • Mission of Burma
  • James Taylor
  • Donna Summer
  • The Cars
  • Letters to Cleo
  • J. Geils Band/ Peter Wolf
  • Joan Baez
  • New Kids on the Block
  • New Edition
  • Mighty Mighty Boss Tones

Jokes and stories

  • The Holy hedgehog
  • Drive carefully—stop and go often
  • Boston Children’s Museum—see Boston Children
  • I’m inspired, Let’s conquer France
  • Pomp and circumstance
  • Sing Solo
  • I know, I think I’ll...
  • Gov stuff, colonist stuff, patriot stuff
  • How do you get to MIT? the red line.Harvard, study.
  • Gov’t Center garage?
  • Where ever you see water, there was more water
  • The guy at Google knows everything. Except why Sister Donata Marie gave me an F in math
  • Ask the guy at You-tube to video it
  • When stuck—I just want to give you an update on our situation CHEERS is still on our right
  • Some guy named Larry
  • At 4pm, announce “The last trolley will be here in # minutes”
  • I’m not going to drink any more but I’m not going to drink any less
  • My kids are great—but i remind them they can run away they are old enough
  • Irish jokes
  • Yogi Berra
  • Dave Allen
  • I love this job.
    If I get reincarnated, I want to be a tour guide all over again.

Crowd peps/Ice breaker

  • 7th ining stretch—stop 9
  • Special occassion
  • Ole, ole
  • Sing alongs—fatima
  • We love you Mary...
  • For he’s a jolly good fellow
  • Where are you from
  • Awards for Furthest/answer question
  • I’m thinking of a number from 1 to 7 billion
    You know what, this isn’t working
  • HAZZAH
  • Murphs; Aunt, Uncle, Cousin, Sister, Brother, GrandMa, Dad, Mom, GrandPa, Son, Daughter

Other conductors

  • Stop 1—get them excited
  • Lisbon talked to guests about rules and tour till Joe’s.
  • Really St Brendan discovered America
  • Supposedly he was leaving his girlfriends house. Doesn’t sound very Puritan to me but, it was the 70s.
  • My 1st concert was 1978—Stixx
  • I saw chart h in 1980
    Van Halen
    Police
    Cars
    Crosby Stills Nash and Young
    Billy Joel
    Todd Rundren
    Tori Amos—but I didn’t buy the ticket
  • My grandmother loved him. My father was impressed with his speaking. Saw him when he ws 10 and influenced him getting into politics.
  • Only time they would talk to us was to say “Hey Paddy, you missed a spot.”
  • A city on a Hill
  • BUT, just cause you shop there doesn’t automatically mean you are a good cook. Apparently you need talent.
  • I figured if I shopped there everything would taste great. No one told me you needed talent too.
  • Did I tell you about my Uncle Murph? I’m not gonna driink anymore...
  • Since we are this close to MIT, lets do some math. Put your math hat on.
    The Bridge is 24,414 inches, how many feet is that? — 2,034 feet.
    How many yards? —678 yards.
    How many meters?—?
    How many Smoots?—364.4 and an ear
  • I don’t run though. I did once, camping. I was with my cousin Murph. We saw a bear. I slow put my sneakers on. He said, ‘You’ll never out run that bear’.
  • Beatles Number 9
  • Boston Artists
  • Not just cause I think so. Architectural Digest syas so too
  • Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
    Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
  • Love The Raven. Read it to my kids on Halloween.
  • How deep is the Frog Pond? Knee Deep, Knee Deep
  • You can see spirits in the bar now
  • My kids go there
  • See Boston children in their natural hbitat
  • The Holy hedgehog
  • Drive carefully—stop and go often
  • Boston Children’s Museum—see Boston Children
  • I’m inspired, Let’s conquer France
  • Pomp and circumstance
  • Sing Solo
  • I know, I think I’ll...
  • Gov stuff, colonist stuff, patriot stuff
  • How do you get to MIT? the red line.Harvard, study.
  • Gov’t Center garage?
  • Where ever you see water, there was more water
  • The guy at Google knows everything. Except why Sister Donata Marie gave me an F in math
  • Ask the guy at You-tube to video it
  • When stuck—I just want to give you an update on our situation CHEERS is still on our right
  • Some guy named Larry
  • At 4pm, announce “The last trolley will be here in # minutes”
  • I’m not going to drink any more but I’m not going to drink any less
  • My kids are great—but i remind them they can run away they are old enough
  • Irish jokes
  • Yogi Berra
  • Dave Allen

 

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